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Familylinks’ new Suboxone Clinic seeks to curb addition

For the wealthy suffering from heroin addiction, there are places like the Eric Clapton-founded Crossroads facility in Antigua. Those of more modest means but with private insurance have many options for inpatient treatment. But for those with insurance through Medicaid, those options are far more limited because not all facilities accept Medicaid, and those that do are often full.

For many of those addicts, especially those mandated by the courts, the only other option was methadone maintenance—meaning they went to a clinic for daily doses of methadone, a synthetic opiate—opioid—that bonds to the same brain receptors as heroin preventing the painful withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting the drug.

Familylinks in East Liberty is one local treatment provider that does accept Medicaid, and it has a residential facility that offers long term and short term—30 days or less—rehabilitation for women that even allows single mothers to have their children stay with them.

During Familylinks’ Recovery Days celebratory event in September, CEO Fred Massey noted that while there are few inpatient treatment options for low-income addicts, there are new maintenance options that research indicates may prove more effective in treating addiction.

That is one of the reasons Familylinks also announced the opening of its new Suboxone Clinic.

“If someone wants to get off opioids, they can come in, meet with a doctor and get the correct dosage to address their level of addiction,” Massey told the Courier last month. “They also get outpatient and group therapy to learn how to avoid the triggers that could lead to relapse. We can also put them in touch with partner organizations address other needs.”

In a recent press release, Massey said that “establishing our agency’s Suboxone Clinic has been a priority for Familylinks as it complements our decades-long experience serving the community with a comprehensive array of direct treatment programs and supportive services for individuals in recovery.”

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