Jude Vachon, 52, found out in November 2016 that the water in her Lawrenceville home had a lead concentration of 38.6 parts per billion — more than double the Environmental Protection Agency’s action level. She now filters her water for drinking and cooking. She is frustrated about the situation and adds: “I’m just concerned about everyone having access to water that’s not going to make them sick.” (Photo by Ryan Loew/PublicSource)

Jude Vachon bought her “sweet little two-bedroom house” in Lawrenceville in 2009. It’s the first place she’s ever owned.

Her home, which she shares with her dog Charlie and cat Bedelia (like Amelia Bedelia), used to give Vachon, 52, a sense of security and safety.

But after getting a “nerve-racking” letter from the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority [PWSA] about lead, she requested a test kit to check her home’s pipes. Scratching the pipes revealed a soft, dull gray metal. The lead test came back at 38.6 parts per billion — more than double the Environmental Protection Agency’s action level.

Now her sanctuary seems threatening. She worries: “Am I being poisoned in my own home?” She can’t afford to replace her service line.

READ ENTIRE STORY AT:

http://publicsource.org/who-should-be-responsible-for-replacing-pittsburghs-lead-water-pipes/

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