In a statement issued today the National Center for Civil and Human Rights addressed the status of the Comfort Women Statue at the Center for Civil and Human Rights. The official statement is cited below:

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights honors and recognizes the history of the South Korean Comfort Women. The Center was principally created to be a place where histories such as theirs would be cited to educate current and future generations of such ills, so as not to repeat them.  That is why we welcomed a proposed partnership with the Atlanta Comfort Women Memorial Task Force, which shines light on this subject and the ongoing human trafficking that continues today in many areas of the world.

Part of the originally proposed partnership was to build an outdoor monument in honor of the Comfort Women. The Center is not in a position to fulfill that aspect of the proposal. Permanent exterior fixtures were not part of the original design or any new strategic plan for the future of the Center for Civil and Human Rights. The Center will continue to find ways to collaborate with the Atlanta Comfort Women Memorial Task Force to highlight the tragic experience of the Comfort Women that will be meaningful and impactful to Center visitors.

The Center continues to live by the mission to empower people to take the protection of every human’s rights personally. Through sharing stories of courage and struggle around the world, The Center encourages visitors to gain a deeper understanding of the role they play in helping to protect the rights of all people. We will continue to explore partnerships with any institution like the Atlanta Comfort Women Memorial Task Force whose mission it is to educate around human trafficking and other human rights violations.

Derreck Kayongo, CEO of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights said, “We are not backing down from our mission to end all forms of human trafficking. We are committed to tell the history of the Comfort Women and use it as a means to honor survivors everywhere.”

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