game-changers

You can’t bear to look at the score.

Whatever it is, it’s going to be close. Both sides are playing well today, and they’re all very talented. Your team might win. They might lose. Or, as in the new book “Game Changers” by Molly Schiot, they might alter the way the whole thing’s played.

Growing up, Schiot says, “I thought only men could be champions.” Most popular sports-themed movies indicated as much; so did TV before cable. Few tales of women in sports were widely known, so Schiot, a Hollywood director, searched until she found a “treasure trove of images” that “inspired me to pull theses stories out of the dark.”

Take the story of Alice Marble.

Marble was a Grand Slam championship tennis winner many times over, but her “post-tennis life” was equally remarkable: shortly after losing both her husband and her baby, Marble became a spy for the Allies during World War II.

Althea Gibson was the first tennis player to break the color barrier at the U.S. Open. But did you know that there were a lot of African American women who fought on the courts before her: Ruth Harris, Lillian Hardy, Alfreda Jackson, Clementine Redmond…?

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