UNDER FIRE—Abdiqadir Dulyar, director for the Somali television station Horn Cable, looks at the smashed window of a car that was carrying journalists working for his station, that unidentified gunmen opened fire on last week although no one was hurt, in Mogadishu, Somalia Tuesday, May 3, 2016. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

UNDER FIRE—Abdiqadir Dulyar, director for the Somali television station Horn Cable, looks at the smashed window of a car that was carrying journalists working for his station, that unidentified gunmen opened fire on last week although no one was hurt, in Mogadishu, Somalia Tuesday, May 3, 2016. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) — For Abdiqadir Dulyar, simply reading messages sent to his phone can be chilling.

His voice breaks as he reads a recent one: “Keep doing what you do, and we shall come to give your well-deserved reward: death.”

Dulyar, the 40-year-old director of the Somali TV station Horn Cable, said the threats often lead him to avoid going home and to stay at his office for weeks at a time.

He said his fear was heightened last week after unidentified men opened fire on a car carrying journalists from his TV station in the capital of Mogadishu. No one was hurt.

Somali journalists frequently receive threats, with many being killed. But police rarely investigate them or adequately protect reporters, according to Human Rights Watch, which on Tuesday marked World Press Freedom Day by issuing a report on the dangers faced by Somali journalists.

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