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BASEBALL ICONS —Mayor Bill Peduto and Charles Poe, SVP of Productions, Smithsonian Channel and Rob Ruck, Sports History Professor University of Pittsburgh sponsored a premiere screening of “The Hammer of Hank Aaron” produced by the Smithsonian Channel and Major League Baseball’s “Major League Legelnds” series, which tells the stories of four players who transcended the National Pastime and left legacies as true American icons. Hank aaron, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Ted Williams. “Major League Legends” premiered over four consecutive Monday nights of “The Hammer of Hank Aaron” at the Senator John Heinz History Center, which was followed by a panel discussion. The documentary featured extensive newly-captured interviews with baseball icon Aaron himself, as he discusses his upbringing in Mobile, Ala and the challenges that he faced growing up in the heart of Jim Crow. “The Hammer” would continue to battle bigotry and racism throughout his life and baseball career. As he sought to unseat Babe Ruth as the all-time home run king, Aaron received numerous death threats and hate mail, making his feat all the more impressive. It seemed justly symbolic that he hit number 715 on April 8, 1974, in Atlanta, the epicenter of the Civil Rights movement. SERIES WEBSITE: http://smithsonianchannel.com/mlb Above the Ford family came out to see the Hammer Hank Aaron movie premiere. (Photos by J. L. Martello)

BASEBALL ICONS —Above the Ford family came out to see the Hammer Hank Aaron movie premiere. (Photos by J. L. Martello)

Mayor Bill Peduto and Charles Poe, SVP of Productions, Smithsonian Channel and Rob Ruck, Sports History Professor University of Pittsburgh sponsored a premiere screening of “The Hammer of Hank Aaron” produced by the Smithsonian Channel and Major League Baseball’s “Major League Legelnds” series, which tells the stories of four players who transcended the National Pastime and left legacies as true American icons.

Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Ted Williams. “Major League Legends” premiered over four consecutive Monday nights of “The Hammer of Hank Aaron” at the Senator John Heinz History Center, which was followed by a panel discussion.

The documentary featured extensive newly-captured interviews with baseball icon Aaron himself, as he discusses his upbringing in Mobile, Ala and the challenges that he faced growing up in the heart of Jim Crow.

“The Hammer” would continue to battle bigotry and racism throughout his life and baseball career. As he sought to unseat Babe Ruth as the all-time home run king, Aaron received numerous death threats and hate mail, making his feat all the more impressive.

It seemed justly symbolic that he hit number 715 on April 8, 1974, in Atlanta, the epicenter of the Civil Rights movement. SERIES WEBSITE: http://smithsonianchannel.com/mlb

TONI AND CRAIG MURPHY

TONI AND CRAIG MURPHY

 

MONIQUE AND REV. ERIC McINTOSH

MONIQUE AND REV. ERIC McINTOSH

 

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