THE STARS CAME OUT—Local hometown Actor Lamman Rucker with mother Nana Malaya Rucker and Godmother Alice Petrecell. (Photos by J.L. Martello)

THE STARS CAME OUT—Local hometown Actor Lamman Rucker with mother Nana Malaya Rucker and Godmother Alice Petrecell. (Photos by J.L. Martello)

As part of a weeks worth of celebrations of August Wilson’s 71st Birthday, among other things, April 25 set the stage for the conversations to begin around Minority inclusion in the Local Film Industry.

In light of the phenomena happening right now in the “sugar top” section of the Hill District; the filming of  “Fences,”  the Friends of the August Wilson Center for African American Culture (AWC) felt it was a good time to provide individuals with an interest in breaking into this industry, the opportunity to learn about how to do so.

The night began with an encore showing of the PBS documentary “The Ground Upon Which I  Stand,” which was a moving depiction of August Wilson’s life as a member of Pittsburgh’s Historic Hill District.  It showed the images, individuals places and things that would go on to inform the characters, their words, and deeds in the 10 play cycle he wrote, all but one of which used Pittsburgh’s Hill District as their background.

Part of the PBS American Master series, the documentary gives viewers a portion of the story of each play, and examines the psycho drama behind some of the scenes.

This film which first aired on PBS two years ago, uncovered the layers of life as August saw it in the Hill District in the years before he relocated to Seattle, Wash.; where he ultimately began creating the theatrical productions that would put that community, and the lives of its residents between the pages and their lives would play out on stages around the country.

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