THE FUTURE?—Mariah Stackhouse is on the Stanford University girl’s golf team. The Cardinal won honors as 2015 NCAA Division 1 champion. (Photo Credit StanfordPhoto.com)

THE FUTURE?—Mariah Stackhouse is on the Stanford University girl’s golf team. The Cardinal won honors as 2015 NCAA Division 1 champion. (Photo Credit StanfordPhoto.com)

AUGUSTA, Ga.—Eldrick “Tiger” Woods was in the city of Augusta, but unfortunately for his lingering and dedicated fan base—he did not participate in this, the 80th annual 2016 Masters Tournament.

Even still, this writer can vividly recall watching a young Tiger teeing-off on long practice shots at the Augusta National Golf Club in April 1995. This was Tiger’s first visit to golf’s hallowed grounds—a couple years before he would set records and become one of golf’s brightest stars—ever.

A couple of decades later to the tee, the heir apparent to Tiger, in the form of young Black successful golfers, is noticeably missing not only on the PGA Tour, but even on the high school and collegiate ranks. We asked several golf enthusiasts for their opinion as to why in what was once thought of as the “Tiger Effect,” no longer has the impact or significance, when it comes to influencing and impacting a subsequent new generation of minority golfers—in the mold of Tiger Woods.

According to an article that appeared in Golf Magazine in July 2013—that publication also asked a similar question but in another form: ‘Where are all the Black golfers two decades after Tiger?’

The golf publication noted that generally, Blacks are still not attracted to the golf game. Golf Magazine writer, Michael Bamberger, then wrote: In 1997, when Tiger won the Masters—by 12! —the floodgates were supposed to open to minority golfers in general and Black golfers in particular. A lot of us felt that way, I among them. I typed these words on that Sunday night 16 years ago, said Bamberger three years ago.

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