Western Conference's Kobe Bryant, of the Los Angeles Lakers, is introduced before the first half of the NBA all-star basketball game, Sunday, Feb. 14, 2016 in Toronto. (Mark Blinch/The Canadian Press via AP)

Western Conference’s Kobe Bryant, of the Los Angeles Lakers, is introduced before the first half of the NBA all-star basketball game, Sunday, Feb. 14, 2016 in Toronto. (Mark Blinch/The Canadian Press via AP)

NEW YORK (AP) _ The NBA says it is “deeply concerned” about a North Carolina law it views as discriminatory toward gays and says it doesn’t know if it can successfully host the All-Star Game in Charlotte next season.

On Thursday, the league joined those opposing the state’s “Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act,” which has been criticized because it allows businesses to discriminate against gays and lesbians.

In a statement, the league says the law “runs counter to our guiding principles of equality and mutual respect,” adding that it does not know yet “what impact it will have on our ability to successfully host the 2017 All-Star Game in Charlotte.”

The events are scheduled for next February, and there have already been calls for the league to move them out of North Carolina because of the law.

 

Also On New Pittsburgh Courier:
comments – Add Yours