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In this June 12, 2014, file photo, Seattle Seahawks' Richard Sherman yells during an NFL organized team activity football practice in Renton, Wash. Where he’s gone from being largely overlooked coming out of Stanford, to being one of the most polarizing figures in the NFL. There isn’t much of a middle ground with Sherman. He’s either loved for a style that borders on cockiness, or he’s despised for the same reason. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

In this June 12, 2014, file photo, Seattle Seahawks’ Richard Sherman yells during an NFL organized team activity football practice in Renton, Wash. Where he’s gone from being largely overlooked coming out of Stanford, to being one of the most polarizing figures in the NFL. There isn’t much of a middle ground with Sherman. He’s either loved for a style that borders on cockiness, or he’s despised for the same reason. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

The definition of the commission of a personal foul in the NBA is: “a. A player shall not hold, push, charge into, impede the progress of an oppo-nent by extending a hand, forearm, leg or knee or by bending the body into a position that is not normal. Contact that results in the re-routing of an opponent is a foul which must be called immediatelyb. Contact initiated by the defensive player guarding a player with the ball is not legal. This contact includes, but is not limited to, forearm, hands, or body check.”

After a player commits his sixth foul he is automatically ejected from the game.  That makes perfect sense.  However NFL defensive players being ejected for committing multiple personal fouls during a National Football League game doesn’t make sense to Richard Sherman, the All-Pro cornerback for the Seattle Seahawks.

Michael Middlehurst-Schwartz recently wrote an article for USATODAY. Seahawks’ Richard Sherman: Roger Goodell ‘foolish’ for ejection proposal. Even in the offseason, Richard Sherman isn’t holding back on his criticism of NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

At the NFL’s owners meeting this week in Boca Raton, Fla., the league’s competition committee will present 19 rule change proposals. A move to eject players who receive two personal foul penalties was supported by Goodell and among the notable items to be discussed. And Goodell’s stance does not sit well with Sherman.

“I think it’s foolish,” Sherman said in an interview on SportsCenter. “But it sounds like something somebody who’s never played the game would say, something that they would suggest, because he doesn’t understand. He’s just a face. He’s just a suit. He’s never stepped foot on the field and understood how you can get a personal foul.”

Aubrey Bruce

Aubrey Bruce

Kudos to Goodell for at least trying to do something to address the “assassin attitude” that a few select NFL Players have toward oftentimes defenseless and vulnerable offensive players. C’mon Rich, gimme a break.  Goodell does not have to have his “clock cleaned” to be aware of the fact: that sh— hurts.  Just like the NFL created the Mel Blount, no contact after 5 yards rule to stop cornerbacks from manhandling wide receivers all over the field as long as the ball was not in flight; the NFL should name the proposed new rule; “the Burfict-anti-thug” rule.

When players begin to be ejected for losing games for their teams as a result of their overly aggressive play, then and only then will they become a bit more cautious in regards to their “thug laced” behavior.

A few of these “dirty” players don’t play the game just to compete.  Oftentimes their primary goal is to cripple, maim and cause serious injury to their opponent to satisfy their “video game infected egos.”

There is a new coldness and callousness by which this “X” generation plays football.  It is my opinion that they reflect the social environment that they come from.  Many of them approach serious violations of the law such as drive by shootings and killings as just a normal day in the hood, so a helmet to the back, neck, head or knee; to a few perverted minds represents nothing more than “fair play.”

I would go even farther then the commissioner. There are 16 games during the regular season for the NFL.  If a player commits 14 personal fouls during the season, that player should be suspended immediately for the remainder of the season but allowed to be reinstated for the postseason.  If that player commits more than 2 personal fouls during the playoffs, that player must be suspended for the remainder of the season including the Super Bowl if his team advances to the title game.

Enough is enough.

The time for the thuggery in the NFL to end is not next week, next month or next year.  The time for the unchecked premediated violence and mayhem to end in professional football is now!

(USA Today was the source for this article)

Aubrey Bruce can be reached at: abruce@newpittsburghcourier.com or 412.583.6741

Follow him on Twitter@ultrascribe.

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