editorial21

Despite recent vows to act more presidential, Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump continues to make bigoted remarks.

Trump said during an interview March 9 that he believes “Islam hates us,” without drawing any distinction between the religion of over 1 billion followers and radical Islamic terrorism.

Trump made the inflammatory comments during an interview with CNN’s Anderson Cooper. In the interview Trump deplored the “tremendous hatred” that he said partly defined the religion.

Asked if he thinks Islam is at war with the West, Trump said: “I think Islam hates us.”

He maintained that the war was against radical Islam, but said, “It’s very hard to define. It’s very hard to separate. Because you don’t know who’s who.”

Trump has a past of stereotyping and disparaging Muslims.

In December, Trump called for a temporary ban on Muslims entering the United States “until we can figure out what is going on,” in the wake of the San Bernardino terror attack.

Trump has also claimed that he saw thousands of Muslims in New Jersey celebrating after the terrorist attack on America on Sept. 11, 2001.

“I watched when the World Trade Center Came tumbling down,” Trump said at a Nov. 21 rally in Birmingham, Ala. “and I watched in Jersey City, J. where thousands and thousands of people were cheering as that building was coming down. Thousands of people were cheering.”

There is no record of an American Muslim celebration on 9/11, but Trump maintains the bogus claim.

Trump’s latest suggestion that an entire world religion hates the United States is offensive and deeply divisive.

These comments along with labeling Mexican immigrants “rapists” and “criminals” are part of a disturbing pattern of broadside attacks by Trump against whole groups of people. Trump’s remarks are beneath what America should expect of a presidential candidate.

Reprinted from the Philadelphia Tribune

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