Credit: Thinkstock

Credit: Thinkstock

NEW YORK (AP)—It’s tax time, so you’d better think twice before clicking on that link in your email inbox.

What may look like a legitimate communication from your bank, human resources department or email provider may actually be part of a scheme designed to steal the confidential information stored in your computer, or to gain access to the network it’s attached to.

Experts warn that tax season is a prime time for this brand of fraud known as “phishing,” with hackers out to steal your information in hopes of using it to file a false tax return.

Phishing emails remain one of the top causes of data breaches. While people are more aware of their danger than ever before, the lures continue to evolve and increase in sophistication, making it tough for the average person to discern which emails are legitimate and which ones aren’t.

Here are a few answers to common questions about phishing:

1 2Next page »

Also On New Pittsburgh Courier:
comments – Add Yours