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 Ahmirah Porter, 9, stands silently behind a sign that reads "I've been poisoned by policy," as she joins more than 150 activists protest outside of City Hall to protest Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder's handling of the water crisis Friday, Jan. 8, 2016 in Flint. Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

Ahmirah Porter, 9, stands silently behind a sign that reads “I’ve been poisoned by policy,” as she joins more than 150 activists protest outside of City Hall to protest Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s handling of the water crisis Friday, Jan. 8, 2016 in Flint. Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

FLINT, Mich. —  Michigan State Police and other state employees will go door-to-door in Flint handing out bottled water, water testing kits and other resources to families affected by the city’s water crisis.

The state said Sunday that the water resource teams will go into Flint neighborhoods beginning Tuesday.

They also will distribute water filters and replacement cartridges. Officials announced Saturday that five city fire stations will serve as water resource sites for residents.

Water drawn from the Flint River leached lead from old plumbing for months. Testing in October detected increased lead levels in residential water supplies and in children’s blood.

Gov. Rick Snyder last week declared an emergency in Flint.

Three liaison officers from the Federal Emergency Management Administration also are in Michigan to provide technical assistance to the state.

Flint switched its drinking water source from the Detroit system to the Flint River in April 2014 to save money while the cash-strapped city was led by an emergency manager appointed by the Republican governor. But the city returned to Detroit water in October after testing detected increased lead levels in residential water supplies and in children’s blood. Lead can cause permanent brain damage, leading to behavior problems and learning disabilities.

A state investigation found the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality was largely to blame. Its director, Dan Wyant, resigned last month. Snyder apologized for state government’s role in the crisis.

The Detroit News reported that Weaver said at the news conference that replacing the aging water pipes could cost from “millions up to $1.5 billion.”

 

 

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