Salt, a new half-hour, bi-weekly talk show focused on the ups and downs of being Christian millennials of color during a time when media spaces are often populated with inauthentic “reality” TV shows, is scheduled to debut Sunday, Oct 11 at 8:00 p.m. ET on YouTube.

Hosted by Michelle Jenkins, Yeira De Leon, J. Jones, and L.A. Bonds, Salt will engage in no-holds-barred conversations ranging from news of the day to beauty, fashion and colorism in the Black community. The four outspoken women will also keep it real about their own personal relationships. Whether married, single or somewhere in between (think Netflix and Chill), Salt wants to add its flavor to your Sundays.

With a focus on faith and Christianity, Salt’s goal is not just to entertain. According to a statement released exclusively to Newsone, the women also want to “win back the lost”:

Salt’s overarching goal is to provide an alternative perspective that not only promotes a relationship with Christ, but the “cool” life to be had when you do.  To be young and a Christian has been for so long deemed “unpopular”, but what if someone showed you that is simply not true. That choosing to follow Jesus is not a restriction, but a freedom!  The show, which is filled with so much truth, love, fun, and personal experience, hopes to capture the young minds of today who are being inundated with conflicting information from everywhere.

The growing media continues to push and help shape the thoughts of young adults today, so rather than find an opportunity to live within this media construct, SALT seeks to create their own lane to win back the lost. The Bible tells us to be the SALT and the light of the world and that is what we intend to do.

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With the rise of social media, millennials seem to be more vulnerable than ever to self-hatred, depression, lack of self-confidence, bullying, and suicide. Moreover in the news, young men and women of color are increasingly becoming targets of a love-less system. But with every poor illustration and message of hopelessness, we want to project a message of hope and empowerment. When our viewers watch SALT, we want them to be inspired to share their voice and their faith with the world. We hope to encourage them with our stories and ultimately help restore their hope. Everyone needs a hero, so in one way or another, we point our viewers back to ours, Jesus!

Appealing to more than a Christian base may prove tricky for the show. Even though it’s important to have diversity of thought represented in media spaces, not having faith in Jesus does not make one “lost” any more than having faith in Jesus makes one found. There are agnostic, atheist and Muslim millennials. There are millennials who identify as spiritual beings not restricted by religion.

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So, can a show grounded in “God’s truth and the Gospel of Jesus,” according to SoulFeedTV’s stated purpose, have wide-spread appeal among an increasing secular millennial demographic that is uninterested in being “saved,” no matter how fun the hosts make it seem?

We guess you’ll have to pour a little Salt on your Sundays at 8:00 p.m. ET on YouTube to find out.

[SOURCE: Newsone]

 

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