“Hearing loss is linked to depression, feeling isolated, not being able to live independently and to falls (not being able to hear affects balance and the ability to sense where you are in space). It affects the ability to communicate, which is essential to successful living.” Catherine Palmer, PhD

“Hearing loss is linked to depression, feeling isolated, not being able to live independently and to falls (not being able to hear affects balance and the ability to sense where you are in space). It affects the ability to communicate, which is essential to successful living.”–Catherine Palmer, PhD

Hearing is something most of us take for granted—until we start having problems with it. And we will. About 10 percent of the population has hearing loss; and 70 percent of people older than 70 have significant hearing loss, according to the University of Pittsburgh’s Catherine Palmer, PhD, associate professor of communication science and disorders, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, and of otolaryngology, School of Medicine. Often, people accept hearing loss as a part of getting older. But some kinds of hearing loss are completely preventable. It’s not a health problem that should go untreated.

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