Tag: Women’s health

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National

Sisters of DC chase victim dispute police account

Amy Carey-Jones, center, sister of Miriam Carey, speaks to the media outside the home of her sister Valarie, left, in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo) HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The sisters of a woman fatally shot by police in Washington after she tried to ram her car through a White House barrier say she wasn’t delusional and suggest she may have been fleeing danger when she was killed. Valarie Carey said in an interview on NBC’s “Today” show on Monday that perhaps her sister, Miriam Carey, was afraid and fleeing with a 13-month-old child in her car when she was killed on Thursday. Another sister, retired New York City police officer Amy Carey-Jones, suggests police overreacted or were negligent. The sisters also disputed officials’ account that Miriam Carter was under the delusion that President Barack Obama was communicating with her. Amy Carey-Jones said it’s “not the Miriam we knew.”

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Lifestyle

Coffee, wine and sushi! New pregnancy book says OK

This book cover image released by Penguin Press shows “Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong-and What You Really Need to Know,” by Emily Oster. (AP Photo/Penguin Press) by Leane Italie NEW YORK (AP) — Emily Oster isn’t a baby doctor. She’s an economist and a mom who wanted to know more about all those rules handed down to women after the pregnancy stick goes pink.

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National

Miss. law requires cord blood from some teen moms

Rep. Adrienne Wooten, D-Jackson addresses the House chamber during debate over a Medicaid reauthorization bill at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Wooten voted against a cord blood bill that says if a girl younger than 16 gives birth in Mississippi and won’t name the father authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File) JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — If a girl younger than 16 gives birth and won’t name the father, a new Mississippi law — likely the first of its kind in the country — says authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity as a step toward prosecuting statutory rape cases. Supporters say the law is intended to chip away at Mississippi’s teen pregnancy rate, which has long been one of the highest in the nation. But critics say that though the procedure is painless, it invades the medical privacy of the mother, father and baby. And questions abound: At roughly $1,000 a pop, who will pay for the DNA tests in the country’s poorest state? Even after test results arrive, can prosecutors compel a potential father to submit his own DNA and possibly implicate himself in a crime? How long will the state keep the DNA on file?

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National

C. Everett Koop, 'rock star' surgeon general, dies

DEAD AT 96–In this Oct. 1, 1993 file photo, former Surgeon Genera C. Everett Koop, left, sits with then-first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton during a meeting with more than 100 prominent doctors in the White House in Washington. (AP Photo, File) by Connie Cass Associated Press WriterNEW YORK (AP) — Dr. C. Everett Koop has long been regarded as the nation’s doctor— even though it has been nearly a quarter-century since he was surgeon general.