Tag:  U.S. Republican Party

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National

NC Republicans vow to fight US DOJ over voter laws

In a June 30, 1982 file photo, President Ronald Reagan signs an expansion of the 1965 Voting Rights Bill during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House. The Justice Department will sue the state of North Carolina for alleged racial discrimination over tough new voting rules, the latest effort by the Obama administration to fight back against a Supreme Court decision that struck down the most powerful part of the landmark Voting Rights Act and freed southern states from strict federal oversight of their elections. North Carolina has a new law scaling back the period for early voting and imposing stringent voter identification requirements. It is among at least five Southern states adopting stricter voter ID and other election laws. (AP Photo, File) by Michel Biesecker and Pete Yost RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina’s Republican governor and GOP lawmakers are vowing to fight a lawsuit filed by the U.S. Justice Department challenging the state’s tough new elections law on the grounds it disproportionately impacts minority voters.

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National

Obama mocks GOP for ‘crazy’ Obamacare predictions

President Barack Obama smiles as audience member applaud while the president spoke about the Affordable Care Act, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, at Prince George’s Community College in Largo, Md. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) by Darlene SupervilleAssociated Press Writer LARGO, Maryland (AP) — With just five days to go before Americans can begin signing up for health care under his signature law, President Barack Obama on Thursday ridiculed Republican opponents for “crazy” doomsday predictions of the impact and forecast that even those who didn’t vote for him are going to enroll.

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National

Obama’s no-negotiation stance setting new tone

President Barack Obama speaks about the Affordable Care Act, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, at Prince George’s Community College in Largo, Md. The president is promoting the benefits of his health care law before new insurance exchanges open for business next week. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) by Jim KuhnhennAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — This time, President Barack Obama says, he’s not budging. This is the confrontational Obama, the “Make my day” president, betting Republicans blink to avoid a government shutdown or a first-ever default of the nation’s debts. It’s a proposition not without risk and one with a history of last-minute accommodations on both sides. Brinkmanship between Obama and congressional Republicans has often stopped at the precipice’s edge.

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National

Obama and McCain: Washington’s newest odd couple

In this June 25, 2009 photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. watches as President Barack Obama meets with members of Congress to discuss immigration, in the State Dinning Room of the White House in Washington. Obama and McCain, the Republican he defeated in his first White House campaign, have become one of Washington’s most talked about odd-couple pairings. And like any successful business deal in the nation’s capital, the relationship works because it has benefits for both men. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File) WASHINGTON (AP) — There was no conciliatory phone call, no heart-to-heart talk to soothe the tensions. No one knows exactly when President Barack Obama and Republican Sen. John McCain went from bitter rivals in the 2008 presidential campaign and foes over health care and national security to bipartisan partners.

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National

States promise quick action on election laws

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., accompanied by fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus express disappointment in the Supreme Court’s decision on Shelby County v. Holder that invalidates Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, June 25, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lewis, a prominent activist in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960′s, recalled being attacked and beaten trying to help people in Mississippi to register and vote in the 1960′s. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) by Bill Barrow ATLANTA (AP) — Across the South, Republicans are working to take advantage of a new political landscape after a divided U.S. Supreme Court freed all or part of 15 states, many of them in the old Confederacy, from having to ask Washington’s permission before changing election procedures in jurisdictions with histories of discrimination.

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National

In a first, Black voter turnout rate passes Whites

OHIO VOTER–Lauren Howie, 27, poses outside the School of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan) EDITOR’S NOTE _ “America at the Tipping Point: The Changing Face of a Nation” is an occasional series examining the cultural mosaic of the U.S. and its historic shift to a majority-minority nation. by Hope Yen WASHINGTON (AP) — Black Americans voted at a higher rate than other minority groups in 2012 and by most measures surpassed the White turnout for the first time, reflecting a deeply polarized presidential election in which Blacks strongly supported Barack Obama while many Whites stayed home.

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National

Loyal Democrats wonder: Just who does Obama think he is?

BUILDING LEGACY–In this April 11 photo, President Barack Obama is seen in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File) by Liz Sidoti WASHINGTON (AP) — He wants to slash funding for the Democratic sacred cows of Social Security and Medicare. He doesn’t agree with a judge and women’s rights groups that girls of any age should have easy access to emergency contraception. He has hinted that he may disappoint environmentalists by letting the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline be built.

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National

Rand Paul: GOP must reconnect with African Americans

SEN. RAND PAUL, R-KY (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) by Ashley Killough (CNN) — Republican Sen. Rand Paul, who’s considering a 2016 presidential bid, made a pitch for his party Wednesday at the historically Black Howard University, arguing why the GOP and African Americans should fall in the same column.

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National

Alaska lawmaker apologizes for racial slur

REP. DON YOUNG, R-ALASKA (AP Photo/Dan Joling, File) by Jim Abrams WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Don Young, the gruff Republican veteran who represents the entire state of Alaska, apologized Friday for referring to Hispanic migrant workers as “wetbacks” in a radio interview.