Tag: Tuscaloosa

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Generation Y

‘Bama Greeks in $202 million building boom despite racism controversy

In this photo taken Oct. 26, 2013, guests and residents of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity gather on the lawn prior to an NCAA college football game in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) by Jay ReevesAssociated Press Writer TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) – New multimillion-dollar mansions with white columns, wide balconies and grand foyers line the streets at the University of Alabama, and more are under construction to accommodate the school’s booming enrollment and record membership in Greek-letter groups. But with the powerful Greek system embroiled in controversy over claims of racism and electioneering, some wonder whether the massive expansion serves only to consolidate their power.

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Generation Y

UA president urges inclusion in fraternities

Universtiy of Alabama President Judy Bonner, left center, talks with student Khortlan Patterson, 19, of Houston, Tex., after about 400 students and faculty members marched on the Rose Administration Building to protest the university’s segregated sorority system on the campus in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — University of Alabama officials say school president, Judy Bonner, has asked fraternity leaders to make their chapters more inclusive following allegations of racism influencing the rush process in campus sororities.

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Generation Y

At U of Ala., leaders tread lightly on segregation

In this Sept. 18, 2013, photo, University of Alabama President Judy Bonner, right, shakes hands with student Isaac Bell of Montgomery, Ala., following a march by faculty and students. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) by Jay ReevesAssociated Press Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — From the governor to a U.S. attorney, state and other leaders say they want to move past failed efforts and find to way to permanently end racial segregation in the University of Alabama’s Greek system. But for now they’re treading lightly in forcing change on sorority row.