Tag: Supreme courts

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National

A boost for gay marriage: Justices question US law

PROTESTING–Marriage Equality supporters hold flags in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, March 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) by Kevin Coyne WASHINGTON (AP) — Concluding two days of intense debate, the Supreme Court signaled Wednesday it could give a boost to same-sex marriage by striking down the federal law that denies legally married gay spouses a wide range of benefits offered to other couples.

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National

Changed minds & demographics in gay marriage shift

CHANGE OF MIND–This photo made Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio, shows U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, wearing the red jersey, riding in Pelotonia with his son Will Portman, right. Portman said his views on gay marriage began changing in 2011 when his son, Will, then a freshman at Yale University, told his parents he was gay and that it wasn’t a choice but “part of who he was.” Portman said he and his wife, Jane, were very surprised but also supportive. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete) by Jennifer C. Kerr WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation’s views on gay marriage are more favorable in large part because of a shift in attitudes among those who know someone who is gay or became more accepting as they got older of gays and lesbians, according to a national survey.

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Entertainment

SC court nixes James Brown estate settlement

‘THE GODFATHER”–In this Sunday, Jan. 26, 1997 file photo, James Brown performs during the halftime show at Super Bowl XXXI between the Green Bay Packers and New England Patriots, in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File) by Meg Kinnard Associated Press Writer COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The South Carolina Supreme Court on Wednesday overturned a settlement divvying up the multimillion-dollar estate of James Brown, saying a former attorney general didn’t follow the late soul singer’s wishes in putting together the deal.

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National

Justices voice skepticism of voting rights law

MEETING WITH REPORTERS–Rev. Al Sharpton, right, and Martin Luther King III meet with reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Feb. 27, after arguments in the Shelby County, Ala., v. Holder voting rights case. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) by Mark Sherman Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court’s conservative justices voiced deep skepticism Wednesday about a section of a landmark civil rights law that has helped millions of Americans exercise their right to vote.