Tag: Supreme Court of the United States

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National

Affirmative action ruling contest: race vs. class

In this Sept. 27, 2012 photo, students walk through the University of Texas at Austin campus in Austin, Texas. This giant flagship campus – once slow to integrate – is now among the most diverse the country. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File) by Justin PopeAP Education Writer In post-Great Recession America, which is the bigger barrier to opportunity — race or class? A decade ago, the U.S. Supreme Court kept the focus on race as a barrier, upholding the right of colleges to make limited use of racial preferences to ensure a diverse student body. But in a ruling due this month, the court is widely expected to roll back that decision. Such an outcome would shift attention more toward a less constitutionally controversial practice: giving a boost to socio-economically disadvantaged students, regardless of race. If that happens, it would reflect more than just a more conservative makeup of the justices. Over the last decade, clogged social mobility and rising economic inequality have shifted the conversation on campuses and in the country as a whole. As a barrier to opportunity, class is getting more attention, while race is fading.

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National

Supreme Court rules police can collect DNA from arrestees

This photo taken in April 2009, provided by the Salisbury, Md., Police Department, shows Alonzo Jay King Jr. A narrowly divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that police can collect DNA from people arrested but not convicted of serious crimes, a tool that more than half the states already use to help crack unsolved crimes. (AP photo/Salisbury Police Department via Salisbury Daily Times)WASHINGTON (AP) — A sharply divided Supreme Court on Monday cleared the way for police to take a DNA swab from anyone they arrest for a serious crime, endorsing a practice now followed by more than half the states as well as the federal government.

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National

New sentencing for Ark. inmate given life as teen

NEW SENTENCE–This photo provided by the Arkansas Department of Corrections shows Kuntrell Jackson who was sentenced to life in prison when he was 14 after the shooting death of a store clerk during an attempted robbery in 1999. (AP Photo/Arkansas Department of Corrections) by Jeanne Nuss Associated Press Writer LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A man sentenced to life in prison without parole when he was 14 years old deserves a new sentencing hearing, Arkansas’ highest court ruled Thursday.

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National

High court poised to upend civil rights policies

BLACK STUDENT LEADER–University of Texas senior Bradley Poole poses for a photo on campus near the Martin Luther King Jr. statue in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) by Hope Yen WASHINGTON (AP) — Has the nation lived down its history of racism and should the law become colorblind?

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National

A boost for gay marriage: Justices question US law

PROTESTING–Marriage Equality supporters hold flags in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, March 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) by Kevin Coyne WASHINGTON (AP) — Concluding two days of intense debate, the Supreme Court signaled Wednesday it could give a boost to same-sex marriage by striking down the federal law that denies legally married gay spouses a wide range of benefits offered to other couples.