Tag:  State legislature

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National

States promise quick action on election laws

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., accompanied by fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus express disappointment in the Supreme Court’s decision on Shelby County v. Holder that invalidates Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, June 25, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lewis, a prominent activist in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960′s, recalled being attacked and beaten trying to help people in Mississippi to register and vote in the 1960′s. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) by Bill Barrow ATLANTA (AP) — Across the South, Republicans are working to take advantage of a new political landscape after a divided U.S. Supreme Court freed all or part of 15 states, many of them in the old Confederacy, from having to ask Washington’s permission before changing election procedures in jurisdictions with histories of discrimination.

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Metro

Ex-Pa. Justice Melvin gets house arrest, probation

JOAN ORIE MELVIN (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File) by Joe Mandak PITTSBURGH (AP) — Former state Supreme Court Justice Joan Orie Melvin and her sister avoided prison time for their corruption convictions but were sentenced Tuesday to house arrest for what a judge called crimes of “arrogance.”

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National

Landmark gun bills signed in Colorado

HARD FOUGHT VICTORY–Rep. Rhonda Fields, left, D-Aurora, and Rep. Lois Court, D-Denver, embrace after Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed gun control bills into law at the Capitol in Denver on March 20. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, Pool) by Ivan Moreno Associated Press Writer DENVER (AP) — The governor of Colorado signed bills Wednesday that put sweeping new restrictions on sales of firearms and ammunition in a state with a pioneer tradition of gun ownership and self-reliance.

Opinion

Right to work laws: Will they conquer America?

by Nelson LichtensteinSpecial to CNN (CNN) — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s stunning decision to sign a right-to-work law poses the question: Are these anti-union statutes, which make illegal any union contract that requires union membership or payment of dues a condition of employment, the future? During the last two years Indiana and Wisconsin have also passed laws that curb union strength and slash dues income. NELSON LICHTENSTEIN