Tag: Sexual assault

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National

2 ex-Navy football players to face court-martial

July, 24, 2013 file photos provided by the U.S. Navy Football team, show Midshipman Eric Graham,left, and Midshipman Josh Tate. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy Football team, File) by Brian WitteAssociated Press Writer ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Two U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen will face courts-martial in an alleged sexual assault at an off-campus party while a third will not, the academy’s superintendent decided on Thursday. All three midshipmen were former Navy football players.

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National

Against his will: Female-on-male rape

Entertainer Chris Brown, recently revealed that he lost his virginity when he was 8 years old to a local girl who was 14 or 15. (CNN Photo) by Sarah LaTrent (CNN) – “Go back to sleep.” Groggy from a night of drinking, that’s precisely what James Landrith did. The next morning, Landrith – who was 19 at the time – woke up in a bed that he quickly realized was not his own. As his haze lifted, he recognized the woman who ordered him to sleep the night before as a friend of a friend.

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National

Miss. law requires cord blood from some teen moms

Rep. Adrienne Wooten, D-Jackson addresses the House chamber during debate over a Medicaid reauthorization bill at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Wooten voted against a cord blood bill that says if a girl younger than 16 gives birth in Mississippi and won’t name the father authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File) JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — If a girl younger than 16 gives birth and won’t name the father, a new Mississippi law — likely the first of its kind in the country — says authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity as a step toward prosecuting statutory rape cases. Supporters say the law is intended to chip away at Mississippi’s teen pregnancy rate, which has long been one of the highest in the nation. But critics say that though the procedure is painless, it invades the medical privacy of the mother, father and baby. And questions abound: At roughly $1,000 a pop, who will pay for the DNA tests in the country’s poorest state? Even after test results arrive, can prosecutors compel a potential father to submit his own DNA and possibly implicate himself in a crime? How long will the state keep the DNA on file?