Tag: Science

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International

Arafat’s mysterious death becomes a whodunit

In this May 31, 2002 file photo, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat pauses during the weekly Muslim Friday prayers in his headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File) by John HeilprinAssociated Press Writer RAMALLAH, West Bank (AP) — Yasser Arafat’s mysterious 2004 death turned into a whodunit Thursday after Swiss scientists who examined his remains said the Palestinian leader was probably poisoned with radioactive polonium.

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Lifestyle

Number of plus-size women outweighs number of fashion choices

This undated image provided by H&M shows plus-size model Jennie Runk, who is a size 12 or 14, in a swimsuit ad from 2012. (AP Photo/H&M) by Mae AndersonAP Retail Writer NEW YORK (AP) — When it comes to women’s clothing sizes, there’s some funny math going on. The average American woman is about 25 pounds heavier than she was in 1960. Yet women’s plus-size clothing, generally defined as size 14 and up, still makes up only about 9 percent of the $190 billion spent annually on clothes. What’s wrong with this equation? It’s not that plus-size women aren’t into fashion. Rather, the fashion industry doesn’t seem interested in them.

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Opinion

America’s problem: We’re too dumb

by LZ Granderson (CNN) — I’m a sucker for all of those man-on-the-street interviews that late-night shows do to reveal just how dumb Americans are. It’s fun to laugh at the people who struggle with simple math problems or are unable to find any country we’re at war with on a map. More than a few even get tripped up trying to name the branches of government. It’s all fun and games until you remember that elections have consequences, and that many of those people who said they could name the president — but not the commander in chief — will soon be standing in a voting booth, armed with a ballot.

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International

After Kenya mall attack, children’s trauma lingers

14-month old Azzurra sits with a lipstick kiss on her cheek from her mother Cynthia Carpino, both of whom were caught up in the Westgate Mall attack, at their apartment in Nairobi, Kenya. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis) by Rukmini CallimachiAssociated Press Writer NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — When the shooting began at the Nairobi mall, Cynthia Carpino and her husband hid in the parking lot. But their 1-year-old daughter wouldn’t stop crying. To muffle her cries, her father placed his hand over her mouth so hard she almost suffocated. Little Azzurra fainted in his arms, and three weeks later she’s still not right.

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National

US adults score below average on worldwide test

AP Graphic shows how countries scored in international adult literacy test by Kimberly Hefling Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — It’s long been known that America’s school kids haven’t measured well compared with international peers. Now, there’s a new twist: Adults don’t either.

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International

Spacecraft docks at orbiting Space Station

The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-10M space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky) by Nataliya VasileyvaAssociated Press Writer MOSCOW (AP) — A Soyuz capsule carrying three astronauts successfully docked with the International Space Station early Thursday, bringing the size of the crew at the orbiting outpost to six. Michael Hopkins of the United States and Russians Oleg Kotov and Sergei Ryazansky traveled six hours in the capsule from the Russian-leased launch pad in Kazakhstan before linking up with the space station’s Russian Poisk research module at 6.45 a.m. Moscow time (0245GMT). Kotov is the most experienced member of the crew with two six-month missions in space under his belt while Hopkins and Ryazansky are both on their first missions.