Tag: Robert Bentley

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Generation Y

UA president urges inclusion in fraternities

Universtiy of Alabama President Judy Bonner, left center, talks with student Khortlan Patterson, 19, of Houston, Tex., after about 400 students and faculty members marched on the Rose Administration Building to protest the university’s segregated sorority system on the campus in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — University of Alabama officials say school president, Judy Bonner, has asked fraternity leaders to make their chapters more inclusive following allegations of racism influencing the rush process in campus sororities.

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Generation Y

At U of Ala., leaders tread lightly on segregation

In this Sept. 18, 2013, photo, University of Alabama President Judy Bonner, right, shakes hands with student Isaac Bell of Montgomery, Ala., following a march by faculty and students. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) by Jay ReevesAssociated Press Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — From the governor to a U.S. attorney, state and other leaders say they want to move past failed efforts and find to way to permanently end racial segregation in the University of Alabama’s Greek system. But for now they’re treading lightly in forcing change on sorority row.

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National

Alabama church marks 50th anniversary of bombing

Rev. Julius Scruggs, second from left, leads people in prayer during a wreath laying ceremony at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013. Rev. Jesse Jackson is fourth from left. U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., is at left. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager) by Jay ReevesAssociated Press Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of people Black and White, many holding hands, filled an Alabama church that was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan 50 years ago Sunday to mark the anniversary of the blast that killed four little girls and became a landmark moment in the civil rights struggle.

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National

States promise quick action on election laws

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., accompanied by fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus express disappointment in the Supreme Court’s decision on Shelby County v. Holder that invalidates Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, June 25, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lewis, a prominent activist in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960′s, recalled being attacked and beaten trying to help people in Mississippi to register and vote in the 1960′s. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) by Bill Barrow ATLANTA (AP) — Across the South, Republicans are working to take advantage of a new political landscape after a divided U.S. Supreme Court freed all or part of 15 states, many of them in the old Confederacy, from having to ask Washington’s permission before changing election procedures in jurisdictions with histories of discrimination.