Tag: Richard Nixon

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National

JFK holds complex place in Black history

In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, women burst into tears outside Parkland Hospital upon hearing that President John F. Kennedy died from a shooting while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. (AP Photo/File) by Jesse WashingtonAP National Writer Not that many years ago, three portraits hung in thousands of African-American homes, a visual tribute to men who had helped Black people navigate the long journey to equality. There was Jesus, who represented unconditional hope, strength and love. There was Martin Luther King Jr., who personified the moral crusade that ended legal segregation. And then there was President John F. Kennedy.

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National

JFK’s image shines on despite contradictions

In this July 25, 1960 file photo , Sen. John F. Kennedy, D-Mass., sits with wife, Jacqueline, as she reads to their daughter, Caroline, at Hyannis Port, Mass. (AP Photo) by Hillel ItalieAssociated Press Writer BOSTON (AP) — Four days a week, David O’Donnell leads a 90-minute “Kennedy Tour” around Boston that features stops at government buildings, museums, hotels and meeting halls. Tour-goers from throughout the United States and abroad, who may see John F. Kennedy as inspiration, martyr or Cold War hero, hear stories of his ancestors and early campaigns, the rise of the Irish in state politics, the odd fact that Kennedy was the only president outlived by his grandmother. Yet at some point along the tour, inevitably, questions from the crowd shift from politics to gossip.

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National

In life and especially in death, JFK changed TV

In this July 3, 1963 file photo, U.S. President John F. Kennedy stands at the lectern behind a production slate board during a television taping at the White House. (AP Photo) by Frazier Moore AP Television Writer NEW YORK (AP) — It’s a measure of how long ago President John F. Kennedy died that, at the time, television was described as a young medium. With the shooting in Dallas, TV grew up. Coverage that November weekend 50 years ago signaled, at last, that television could fulfill its grand promise. It could be “more than wires and lights in a box,” in the words of newsman Edward R. Murrow, and not just the “vast wasteland” that Federal Communications Commission chairman Newton Minow had branded it just two years before.