Tag: racial profiling

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National

Sharpton threatens store boycott over profile suit

This July 26, 2013 file photo shows the Rev. Al Sharpton gestures as he takes part in a panel discussion during the National Urban League’s annual conference in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File) by Karen MatthewsAssociated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP) — The Rev. Al Sharpton threatened Saturday to boycott luxury retailer Barneys if the department store doesn’t respond adequately to allegations by Black shoppers that they were racially profiled there. “We’ve gone from stop and frisk to shop and frisk, and we are not going to take it,” the Black civil rights leader said. “We are not going to live in a town where our money is considered suspect and everyone else’s money is respected.”

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International

French court: ID checks on minorities deemed legal

Lawyers acting for the plaintiff, Slim ben Achour, left, and Felix de Belloy talk during a press conferene in Paris, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler) PARIS (AP) — A French court on Wednesday rejected claims that police identity checks on 13 people from minority groups were racist, saying officers didn’t overstep any legal boundaries.

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People

Hollywood couple stopped by police, say they were racially profiled

Actors Dennis White and Cherie Johnson pose together for a photo on September 27. (Photo/Cherie Johnson/iReport) by Katie Hawkins-Gaar and Alan Duke (CNN) — Hollywood couple Cherie Johnson and Dennis White say they were improperly stopped by police, put in handcuffs, and harshly questioned during a recent weekend getaway in South Carolina. They claim the incident took place because of their race. Johnson, best known for her roles in TV shows “Punky Brewster” and “Family Matters,” and White, from the movie “Notorious,” are speaking out about their treatment by a Marion County sheriff’s deputy on September 22.

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International

Swedish Gypsy file brings racial profiling fears

Marcello Demeter stands on the balcony of his apartment in a Stockholm suburb. (AP Photo/David Mac Dougall) by Malin RisingAssociated Press WriterSTOCKHOLM (AP) — In his suburban Stockholm apartment, Marcello Demeter sits at the kitchen table with two of his daughters — and wonders how they got on the list that has sent Sweden into an uproar. About a week ago, the 42-year-old Swede found out that he and his wife, their three children and at least three of their grandchildren were on a secret police register purportedly created to help fight violent crime. The reason? They are Gypsies.

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National

NYC mayor lambastes stop-and-frisk ruling

Nicholas Peart, Lilat Clarkson, Leroy Downes, Devin Almonar and David Ourlicht, left to right, plaintiffs in the stop and frisk case, pose for a photo after a news conferece at the Center for Constitutional Rights, in New York, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) by Colleen Long Associated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge’s stinging rebuke of the police department’s stop-and-frisk policy as discriminatory could usher in a return to the days of high violent crime rates and end New York’s tenure as “America’s safest big city,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned.

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National

Zimmerman portrayed as vigilante in Fla. shooting

The father of Trayvon Martin, Tracy Martin, cries as he listens to the description of his son’s death during opening statements in the George Zimmerman trial, with Sybrina Fulton, Trayvon’s mother, left, and Daryl Parks, a family attorney, right, in Seminole circuit court, in Sanford, Fla., Monday, June 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Orlando Sentinel, Joe Burbank/Pool) by Kyle HightowerAssociated Press Writer SANFORD, Fla. (AP) — George Zimmerman was fed up with “punks” getting away with crime and shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin “because he wanted to,” not because he had to, prosecutors argued Monday, while the neighborhood watch volunteer’s attorney said the killing was self-defense against a young man who was slamming Zimmerman’s head against the pavement. The prosecution began opening statements in the long-awaited murder trial with shocking language, repeating obscenities Zimmerman uttered while talking to a police dispatcher moments before the deadly confrontation.