Tag: Primary and secondary education

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Generation Y

Stephen Covey’s ’7 Habits’ shakes up schools

Students walk between classes past a sign extolling a leadership principle at Indian Trails Elementary school in Independence, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) by Heather HollingsworthAssociated Press Writer INDEPENDENCE, Mo. (AP) — One year after Johnathan Kent kicked his principal and school “went all bad,” the 8-year-old was recognized at a recent assembly as the “Star of the Month” for being polite and helping out his teachers. The third-grader’s explanation for the turnaround: “I’m not doing what I did last year.” But Emily Cross, the principal of Indian Trails Elementary on the outskirts of Kansas City, Mo., is giving some credit to a program the school began using last year that is built around the late self-help guru Stephen Covey’s best-selling “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.” A 25th anniversary edition of the 1989 book will be released in November.

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Opinion

America’s problem: We’re too dumb

by LZ Granderson (CNN) — I’m a sucker for all of those man-on-the-street interviews that late-night shows do to reveal just how dumb Americans are. It’s fun to laugh at the people who struggle with simple math problems or are unable to find any country we’re at war with on a map. More than a few even get tripped up trying to name the branches of government. It’s all fun and games until you remember that elections have consequences, and that many of those people who said they could name the president — but not the commander in chief — will soon be standing in a voting booth, armed with a ballot.

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International

Artists, educators laud Black heritage in DR

In this Sept. 27, 2013 photo, Dominican actresses Clara Morel, left, and Luz Bautista Matos, of the theater group “Arbol Maravilloso,” or “Wonderful Tree,” pose for a photo after their performance for school children in Moca, Dominican Republic. Their theater group has visited schools across the country to spread the word among Black children that their features and heritage should be a source of pride. (AP Photo/Manuel Diaz) by Ezequiel Abiu LopezAssociated Press Writer SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP) — In a school auditorium filled with laughing students, actresses Luz Bautista Matos and Clara Morel threw themselves into acting out a fairy tale complete with a princess, a hero and acts of derring-do. Morel had wrapped a white plastic sheet around her multi-colored blouse, while Bautista donned a brown paper bag over her blue tights. The two Black actresses wore their hair free and natural, decorated only with single pink flowers. “Yes, you’re a princess,” said Bautista to Morel, who fretted that she didn’t look like a traditional princess with her dark complexion and hair. Bautista then turned to a young girl sitting in the front row, who shared the same African-descended features as both actresses. “And you too,” Morel said as the child smiled back at her. The theater group Wonderful Tree has visited schools all over Santo Domingo and some in the countryside to spread the word among Black children that their features and heritage should be a source of pride. That message, though simple, has been nothing less than startling in this Caribbean country, where 80 percent of people are classified as mulattos, meaning they have mixed Black-White ancestry, but where many still consider being labeled Black an offense.

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National

US adults score below average on worldwide test

AP Graphic shows how countries scored in international adult literacy test by Kimberly Hefling Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — It’s long been known that America’s school kids haven’t measured well compared with international peers. Now, there’s a new twist: Adults don’t either.