Tag:  Political issues

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Metro

Peduto beats 2 opponents for Pittsburgh mayor

Democratic candidate for Mayor of Pittsburgh, City Councilman Bill Peduto, right, walks with his communications director Sonya Toler on his way to vote in the Pennsylvania primary election on May 21. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic/File) PITTSBURGH (AP) — Democrat Bill Peduto has defeated a pair of weak opponents in his bid for a four-year term as Pittsburgh’s next mayor.

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National

JFK holds complex place in Black history

In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, women burst into tears outside Parkland Hospital upon hearing that President John F. Kennedy died from a shooting while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. (AP Photo/File) by Jesse WashingtonAP National Writer Not that many years ago, three portraits hung in thousands of African-American homes, a visual tribute to men who had helped Black people navigate the long journey to equality. There was Jesus, who represented unconditional hope, strength and love. There was Martin Luther King Jr., who personified the moral crusade that ended legal segregation. And then there was President John F. Kennedy.

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National

For Obama, a frustrating health care rollout

In this photo taken Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, President Barack Obama sits for an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in the White House library in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Julie PaceAP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — Last week, President Barack Obama gathered some of his top advisers in the Oval Office to discuss the problem-plagued rollout of his health care legislation. He told his team the administration had to own up to the fact that there were no excuses for not having the health care website ready to operate on Day One.

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National

As government re-opens Obama warns: “The American people are completely fed up with Washington”

BACK IN BUSINESS–President Barack Obama speaks in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington on Oct. 17, 2013. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) by Andrew TaylorAssociated Press WriterWASHINGTON (AP) — The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress’ bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America’s credibility around the world.

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National

Time to throw my bum out of Congress?

President Barack Obama delivers the State of the Union address in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., February 12, 2013. (Photo by Lawrence Jackson/The White House) by Paul SteinhauserCNN Political Editor (CNN) — It’s conventional wisdom: Americans don’t like Congress. But when it comes time to vote, they usually don’t throw their lawmaker out of office. However, new polls indicate that times and perceptions about “throwing the bums out” may be changing.

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Opinion

Republicans, stop living in fear

by Donna Brazile (CNN) — As Senate negotiators, led by Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell huddle for another day to avoid the nation’s default this week, we’ll know in a few days if Congress — more accurately, House Republicans — will choose to plunge this nation into a second recession, possibly triggering a global financial meltdown, or agree to compromise.

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National

Obama to public: Don’t give up on health sign-ups

In this photo taken Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, President Barack Obama speaks during an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in the White House library in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Julie PaceAP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — Defending the shaky rollout of his health care law, President Barack Obama said frustrated Americans “definitely shouldn’t give up” on the problem-plagued program now at the heart of his dispute with Republicans over reopening the federal government.

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National

Supreme Court term begins with contentious topics

Cardinal Donald Wuerl walk with U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts as they leave the church, after the Red Mass at Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington on Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is beginning a new term with controversial issues that offer the court’s conservative majority the chance to move aggressively to undo limits on campaign contributions, undermine claims of discrimination in housing and mortgage lending, and allow for more government-sanctioned prayer.