Tag: Political and civil unrest

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National

JFK holds complex place in Black history

In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, women burst into tears outside Parkland Hospital upon hearing that President John F. Kennedy died from a shooting while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. (AP Photo/File) by Jesse WashingtonAP National Writer Not that many years ago, three portraits hung in thousands of African-American homes, a visual tribute to men who had helped Black people navigate the long journey to equality. There was Jesus, who represented unconditional hope, strength and love. There was Martin Luther King Jr., who personified the moral crusade that ended legal segregation. And then there was President John F. Kennedy.

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National

1960 Md. sit-in case remembered as part of history

In this Dec. 4, 2006, file photo, Chief Judge Robert M. Bell listens to arguments in the Maryland Court of Appeals in Annapolis, Md. (AP Photo/Chris Gardner, File) by Jessica GreskoAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — Robert M. Bell was 16 years old when he recruited classmates to join a sit-in at a downtown Baltimore restaurant. The sit-in was Bell’s first, and he remembers being a little nervous. On the afternoon of June 17, 1960, the group entered Hooper’s restaurant, and a hostess said she wouldn’t seat them. “I’m sorry, but we haven’t integrated as yet,” she said. The group pushed past her and sat anyway. Police were called, and 12 demonstrators, including Bell, were charged with trespassing. Eventually, the case made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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National

Sharpton threatens store boycott over profile suit

This July 26, 2013 file photo shows the Rev. Al Sharpton gestures as he takes part in a panel discussion during the National Urban League’s annual conference in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File) by Karen MatthewsAssociated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP) — The Rev. Al Sharpton threatened Saturday to boycott luxury retailer Barneys if the department store doesn’t respond adequately to allegations by Black shoppers that they were racially profiled there. “We’ve gone from stop and frisk to shop and frisk, and we are not going to take it,” the Black civil rights leader said. “We are not going to live in a town where our money is considered suspect and everyone else’s money is respected.”

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National

At tea party-like rally, Obama told to ‘put the Quran down’

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks at a rally in front of the WWII Memorial Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013 in Washington.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) by Ashley Killough, Shannon Travis and Brian Rokus WASHINGTON (CNN) — Angered by the closure of national landmarks due to the partial government shutdown, a crowd of conservatives removed barricades Sunday at the World War II Memorial and the Lincoln Memorial as they rallied against President Barack Obama and Democrats for their role in the ongoing stalemate. High-profile speakers with close ties to the tea party appeared at the event, including former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas. The rally, billed as the “Million Vet March on the Memorials,” drew far fewer than a million people and evolved into a protest that resembled familiar tea party events from 2009, with yellow “Don’t Tread On Me” flags throughout the crowd and strong anti-Obama language from the podium and the audience.

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Opinion

I’m a male feminist. No, seriously

by John Brougher (CNN) — Feminism’s gotten a bad rap lately. For many, even just the word itself conjures up images of radical ideology. Pop music star Taylor Swift and Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, to cite two famous examples, asserted that they’re pro-equality, but won’t identify as feminists.

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National

Alabama church marks 50th anniversary of bombing

Rev. Julius Scruggs, second from left, leads people in prayer during a wreath laying ceremony at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013. Rev. Jesse Jackson is fourth from left. U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., is at left. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager) by Jay ReevesAssociated Press Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of people Black and White, many holding hands, filled an Alabama church that was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan 50 years ago Sunday to mark the anniversary of the blast that killed four little girls and became a landmark moment in the civil rights struggle.