Tag: Organized crime

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National

NY woman who ran family drug ring faces prison

This photo provided by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, via The Buffalo News shows Theresa Anderson. Anderson, 58, faces 14 to 17 1/2 years in prison when she is sentenced Oct. 8 for running a 12-year operation that monopolized crack cocaine sales in her neighborhood. Police say she sold drugs from numerous homes she owned and employed her grown children and close acquaintances. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney’s Office, via The Buffalo News) BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — For a dozen years, Theresa Anderson was the queen of Deshler Street. The unassuming woman owned five small wooden houses along the poor side street, filling them with her children, grandchildren and other relatives who kept their lots tidy, watched out for trouble and pitched in with the family business.

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International

Infamous drug lord freed after conviction overturned in 1985 killing of DEA agent

The undated file photo distributed by the Mexican government shows Rafael Caro Quintero, considered the grandfather of Mexican drug trafficking. (AP Photo/File) by Adriana Gomez LoconAssociated Press Writer MEXICO CITY (AP) — U.S. law enforcement officials expressed outrage over the release from prison of Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero and vowed to continue efforts to bring to justice the man who ordered the killing of a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent.

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National

AP IMPACT: Cartels dispatch agents deep inside US

BUSTED– In this Nov. 4, 2010 photo, bales of marijuana are wheeled out at a news conference in Jonesboro, Ga. Forty-five people were arrested 45 people along with cash, guns and more than two tons of drugs as part of an investigation by federal and local law enforcement into the Atlanta-area U.S. distribution hub of Mexico’s La Familia drug cartel. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, John Spink) by Michael Tarm CHICAGO (AP) — Mexican drug cartels whose operatives once rarely ventured beyond the U.S. border are dispatching some of their most trusted agents to live and work deep inside the United States — an emboldened presence that experts believe is meant to tighten their grip on the world’s most lucrative narcotics market and maximize profits.