Tag: Oklahoma

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People

Musician JJ Cale dies; wrote Clapton, Skynyrd hits

In this June 5, 2004 photo, singer-songwriter J.J. Cale plays during the Eric Clapton Crossroads Guitar Festival in Dallas, Texas. Cale, whose best-known songs became hits for Eric Clapton with “After Midnight” and Lynyrd Skynyrd with “Call Me the Breeze,” has died. He was 74. Cale’s manager Mike Kappus said the architect of the Tulsa Sound died Friday, July 26, 2013 of a heart attack at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File) If musicians were measured not by the number of records they sold but by the number of peers they influenced, JJ Cale would have been a towering figure in 1970s rock ‘n’ roll. His best songs like “After Midnight,” ”Cocaine” and “Call Me the Breeze” were towering hits — for other artists. Eric Clapton took “After Midnight” and “Cocaine” and turned them into the kind of hard-party anthems that defined rock for a long period of time. And Lynyrd Skynyrd took the easy-shuffling “Breeze” and supercharged it with a three-guitar attack that made it a hit.

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National

African Americans disproportionately affected by disasters

Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005, causing billions of dollars of damage and a death toll in the thousands. (Photo courtesy of Dan Anderson) by Stacy M. BrownSpecial to the NNPA from The Washington Informer The tornado which devastated an Oklahoma town last month has once again sparked debate about emergency preparedness, particularly in the African American community where disaster readiness hasn’t always been a priority. “We’ve seen the effects of September 11, Hurricane Katrina, and other disasters. We’ve also seen the effects they have had, especially on Black people,” said Cindy Vaughn, a Prince George’s County resident. “However, we (African Americans) tend not to pay too much attention to these things and that’s one of the main reasons why we’re not always prepared when natural disasters and other tragedies strike,” she said. The attitude toward preparedness among America’s Black population remains nonchalant despite frequent disaster occurrences and rising death tolls, according to several studies.

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Opinion

The extraordinary courage of teachers

by LZ Granderson(CNN) — Each day more than 55 million students attend the country’s 130,000 schools. Each day, parents and guardians entrust some 7 million teachers with the education of our children. And on a normal day, that is all we expect teachers to do — teach. But on those not-so normal days we are reminded that for six hours a day and more, five days a week, teaching is not the only thing teachers are charged with doing. On those not-so-normal days, we are reminded that teachers are also asked to be surrogate parents, protectors, heroes. Monday was one of those not-so-normal days.

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National

Teachers credited with saving students in Okla.

Teachers carry children away from Briarwood Elementary school after a tornado destroyed the school in south Oklahoma City, Okla, May 20. (AP Photo/ The Oklahoman, Paul Hellstern) by David A. LiebMOORE, Okla. (AP) — The principal’s voice came on over the intercom at Plaza Towers Elementary School: A severe storm was approaching and students were to go to the cafeteria and wait for their parents to pick them up. But before all of the youngsters could get there, the tornado alarm sounded. The plan changed quickly.

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Sports

Steelers trade up to get safety and record setting quarterback

FOURTH ROUND PICK– Oklahoma quarterback Landry Jones passes against Texas A&M during the first half of the Cotton Bowl NCAA college football game in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File) by Smokin’ Jim Frazier The Steelers traded away their third round pick in 2014 to the Cleveland Browns to get an additional pick in the fourth round and then drafted a safety and a quarterback.