Tag: Obamacare

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Health

Making good decisions about your health

Candi Castleberry-Singleton, Chief inclusion officer, UPMC and Yvonne Cook, Vice president of community and health initiatives,Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield Every day, people make decisions about their health care. They read directions on a prescription label. They determine how much medicine to take or give to a loved one. They see TV ads for specific medications. They have conversations with health care providers or their health insurance companies. People need to be able to understand health information. It is essential to good health. Health literacy is the degree to which people get, use and understand basic health information and services to make good health decisions. But research shows that most health information is not presented in a way that many adults easily understand. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than one third of U.S. adults have difficulty with common health tasks, such as following directions on a prescription medicine label or sticking to a childhood immunization schedule using a chart. Not being able to do such tasks correctly can lead to serious health problems.

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Opinion

The truth about Obamacare from FactCheck.org

GEORGE E. CURRY (NNPA)—Major provisions of the Affordable Care Act went into effect on Tuesday and, like all new programs, there was a certain amount of uncertainty and confusion. But making things worse are the deliberate lies that have been told by what some call Obamacare.

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Generation Y

Obamacare: Health insurers fear young people will opt out

College student Francois Louis, 20, poses for a photo in Davie, Fla. Louis can’t remember the last time he went to the doctor and gets by on over the counter medication or health remedies whenever he’s sick. He’d love to be able to the doctor and have a check-up, but says it’s just too expensive on his salary of less than $15,000 a year. For millions of unemployed and underemployed twenty-somethings, many who are still living at home in the wake of a recession, health care has been out of reach. Now sweeping federal health laws are promising make coverage more affordable, but the big question remains, will it be affordable enough? (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee) by Kelli KennedyAssociated Press Writer MIAMI (AP) — Dan Lopez rarely gets sick and hasn’t been to a doctor in 10 years, so buying health insurance feels like a waste of money. Even after the federal health overhaul takes full effect next year, the 24-year-old said he will probably decide to pay the $100 penalty for those who skirt the law’s requirement that all Americans purchase coverage.