Tag: NNPA

Bernal_Smith_II-600.jpg

Business

Memphis Tri-State Defender gets new ownership

Publisher and President Bernal E. Smith II has engineered a deal that brings local ownership to the TSD. (Photo: Warren Roseborough) For the first time in its storied 62-year history, the Memphis Tri-State Defender will be both locally owned and operated. Following an extended period of discussion and negotiations, Real Times Media, Inc. (RTM) has agreed to sell the assets of Tri-State Defender, Inc. (TSD) to BEST Media Properties, Inc., a Tennessee Corporation established by current TSD President and Publisher, Bernal E. Smith II.

DossHiram.jpg

National

Real Times Media garners two seats on the Board of the National Newspaper Publishers Association

Rod Doss, Editor and Publisher of the New Pittsburgh Courier and Hiram E. Jackson, publisher of the Michigan Chronicle, both win seats at NNPA’s National Convention Detroit (July 11, 2013) – Hiram E. Jackson, publisher of the Michigan Chronicle and Rod Doss, publisher of the New Pittsburgh Courier, were both recently elected to the Board of Directors of the National Newspaper Publisher Association (NNPA) at the organization’s annual convention. Both papers are part of a conglomerate of five (5) newspapers owned by Real Times Media, the largest newspaper organization in the NNPA.

1_21_jackson_jesse.jpg

International

Obama must see Africa in a new light

by Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. (NNPA)–When President Obama and the first lady travel to Africa at the end of this month, they will receive a rapturous greeting. The president’s deep roots in Kenya, the land of his father, resonate throughout the continent. His success in the United States evokes pride and joy in Africa. I write this from Nigeria, a country that has just celebrated its 14th year of democracy. President Obama’s election enabled Africans to see America in a new light. I hope his visit will enable Americans to see Africa with new eyes.

Wayne-Fredrick.jpg.jpg

Generation Y

College: ‘The best four or five years of your life’

by Maya Rhodan NNPA Washington Correspondent WASHINGTON (NNPA) – When Mecala Holmes was a freshman at Howard University in 2008, she recalls seeing a t-shirt in the school’s book store that read “Howard University, the best four or five years of your life.” Holmes recalled, “I saw that and thought ‘I’m not going to be here for five years. And then I finished my freshman year and I thought ‘I’m about to finish in five years.” Holmes, a computer engineering major, decided to take 12 credits every semester to better balance her challenging curriculum with the social opportunities Howard had to offer—from events, to social and service organizations such as Jewels, Inc. a mentoring program she was an active member of throughout college. Twelve credits per semester, however, wouldn’t help her accrue the 126 she needed to graduate within four years. Although Holmes had realized she wouldn’t be graduating with the class, watching her friends and peers prepare for their long-awaited commencement without her was emotional for her. “Last year, I cried on graduation day,” Holmes said. “But if I had graduated last year I wouldn’t have the opportunities I have now. Looking back, I wouldn’t have done it differently.”

Education_One_with_Sam_Cephas_LIVE.jpg

National

Hartford Man Seeks to Expand Educational Practice

by Maya RhodanNNPA Washington Correspondent WASHINGTON (NNPA) – When Samuel Cephas was a child, he recalls his mother, preaching the importance of a solid education.“Everything was about education,” Cephas says of his Cuban-born mom. The youngest of four, he remembers taking his schoolwork seriously—from the private school he attended while living in the South Bronx in New York, to the Catholic school and summer programs he enrolled in after his family moved to Connecticut. Education was his priority. It was almost natural, then, after his mother died in the late 90s, for Cephas to set out and start a business that allowed him to instill the value of education to children of his heritage in Hartford, Conn. He began by focusing on American Indian children. Cephas is half Native American, who represent about 1 percent of the population of Hartford, but lived mainly in the inner city. “When I look at Natives, we were the last of the last,” Cephas says.