Tag: National Football Conference

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Sports

Steelers beat Bills in unimpressive manner

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger (7) is sacked by Buffalo Bills outside linebacker Jerry Hughes (55) and Buffalo Bills free safety Jim Leonhard (35) during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 10, 2013, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) It might just be me and maybe I see the glass as half empty but after the Steelers beat the Bills 23-10 on Sunday, I wasn’t left impressed. Sure, the game really wasn’t in question after the 2nd quarter but this victory was hollow. The Steelers beat a team who was just as bad as they are. The Bills are 3-6, so are the Steelers. If anyone expected the Bills to put on a display like the Patriots did a week prior, they don’t understand football.

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Sports

Tony Dorsett struggles with memory loss, personality changes

Former University of Pittsburgh and NFL Hall of Fame running back Tony Dorsett stands on the sideline before the start of an NCAA football game between Pittsburgh and Notre Dame on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) by Steve Almasy and Eliott C. McLaughlin (CNN) — Tony Dorsett recalls a 1984 game against the Philadelphia Eagles when he was streaking up the field and an opposing player slammed into him. One helmet plowed into another. Dorsett’s head snapped back, his helmet was knocked askew. “He blew me up,” Dorsett told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer. “I don’t remember the second half of that game, but I do remember that hit.” Dorsett compared the hit to a freight train hitting a Volkswagen.

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Opinion

Column: Miami case about conformity, not toughness

In this Dec. 16, 2012 file photo, Miami Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin (71) watches from the sidelines during the second half of an NFL football game against the Jacksonville Jaguars, in Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File) by Paul NewberryAP Sports Columnist To his Miami Dolphins teammates, Jonathan Martin came across as someone who needed “toughening up.” But what does that mean, exactly, when you’re talking about a 6-foot-4, 320-pound guy who already had proven he was tough enough to play a violent, brutal sport at the highest level?

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Sports

Adrian Peterson has dealt with tragedy often

Minnesota Vikings’ Adrian Peterson makes his way off an NFL football practice field at Winter Park in Eden Prairie, Minn., Friday, Oct. 11, 2013. Peterson said he is certain he will play Sunday despite a serious personal matter that caused him to miss practice earlier this week. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Elizabeth Flores) by Dave CampbellAP Pro Football Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — When Adrian Peterson was 7, he saw his older brother die in a bike accident when he was hit by a drunken driver. For Peterson’s teenage years, his father was in prison. He grew up poor in east Texas. Shortly before the Minnesota Vikings drafted him in 2007, a half-brother, was shot and killed. Long before Peterson began running through the NFL record book, he learned to turn tragedy into fuel for an exceptional career. Football has always been his escape, and now he’s dealing with more off-the-field strife.

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National

Just how many Indians think ‘Redskins’ is a slur?

Zena “Chief Z” Williams, unofficial mascot of the Washington Redskins, signs autographs during fan appreciation day at the Redskins’ NFL football training camp at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File) by Jesse WashingtonAP National Writer The name of a certain pro football team in Washington, D.C., has inspired protests, hearings, editorials, lawsuits, letters from Congress, even a presidential nudge. Yet behind the headlines, it’s unclear how many Native Americans think “Redskins” is a racial slur. Perhaps this uncertainty shouldn’t matter – because the word has an undeniably racist history, or because the team says it uses the word with respect, or because in a truly decent society, some would argue, what hurts a few should be avoided by all.

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National

Obama to public: Don’t give up on health sign-ups

In this photo taken Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, President Barack Obama speaks during an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in the White House library in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Julie PaceAP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — Defending the shaky rollout of his health care law, President Barack Obama said frustrated Americans “definitely shouldn’t give up” on the problem-plagued program now at the heart of his dispute with Republicans over reopening the federal government.

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Sports

Former heavyweight champion Norton dies

In this Sept. 10, 1973, file photo, Muhammad Ali, right, winces as Ken Norton hits him with a left to the head during their re-match at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif. Norton, a former heavyweight champion, has died, his son said, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. He was 70. (AP Photo/File) by Tim DahlbergAP Boxing Writer LAS VEGAS (AP) — One point on one card, a couple of points on some others. Ken Norton fought the greats, but the decisions he needed to be great never seemed to go his way. He busted Muhammad Ali’s jaw to hand him only his second defeat. But he lost two narrow decisions to Ali the next two times they’d meet, including their final 1976 fight at Yankee Stadium. And after he lost by just one point to Larry Holmes in their 1978 heavyweight title fight, Norton’s career was all but over. “Kenny was a good, good fighter. He beat a lot of guys,” said Ed Schuyler Jr., who covered many of Norton’s fights for The Associated Press. “He gave Ali fits because Ali let him fight coming forward instead of making him back up.”