Tag: NAACP

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Metro

NAACP: New exams block graduation

CONNIE PARKER Calling it a “present day form of Eugenics” 45 NAACP branches from Erie to Easton and from McKeesport to Mercer, have signed on to a letter calling on the Pennsylvania State Board of Education to end the newly enacted requirement for high school seniors to pass the Keystone Examinations in order to graduate.

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Metro

Hawkins and Parker back on PAT board

AMANDA GREEN HAWKINS AND CONNIE PARKER The day after the New Pittsburgh Courier asked NAACP Pittsburgh Unit President and PennDOT Community Relations Coordinator Connie Parker about her status as a former Port Authority Board director, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald nominated her again.

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Generation Y

My internship at the NAACP

Curtis Parker Dear Editor: What an experience I have had. The 13 weeks that I have worked as the NACCP intern I was able to experience the nonprofit work force atmosphere. Working as the NAACP intern allowed me to have an in depth intimate look at just how the world’s oldest secular organization helps people. Since May 20 I have worked as the NAACP intern, during that time I believe I discovered the main thing that makes the NAACP work, the people. Each day at the NAACP welcomes a new challenge. Working here has brought me across a lot of people, some who need help, some who want to help, and some in organizations like the NAACP who fight the day to day challenge of making our community a better place. No matter whether their intentions or origins were, I’ve learned that the power is truly in people. The people hold the power to make a difference. During my time here I was blessed with the opportunity to play my small part in helping the people of our community.

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National

On Martin case, Obama shifts from passion to calm

With the burden for future charges in the death of Trayvon Martin now squarely on his administration, President Barack Obama is seeking to inject calm into a case that has inflamed passions, including his own. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Barack Obama first addressed the death of Trayvon Martin last year, he did so passionately, declaring that if he had a son, he would look like the slain 17-year-old. His powerful and personal commentary marked a rare public reflection on race from the nation’s first Black president.

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National

States promise quick action on election laws

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., accompanied by fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus express disappointment in the Supreme Court’s decision on Shelby County v. Holder that invalidates Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, June 25, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lewis, a prominent activist in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960′s, recalled being attacked and beaten trying to help people in Mississippi to register and vote in the 1960′s. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) by Bill Barrow ATLANTA (AP) — Across the South, Republicans are working to take advantage of a new political landscape after a divided U.S. Supreme Court freed all or part of 15 states, many of them in the old Confederacy, from having to ask Washington’s permission before changing election procedures in jurisdictions with histories of discrimination.

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National

This Week In Black History

1995—Song-stylist and singer Phyllis Hyman commits suicide in New York City shortly before she was scheduled to perform at a concert. For the week of June 26-July 2 June 261899—Black inventor William H. Richardson redesigns the baby carriage. While the idea for the baby carriage is nearly 300 years old, Richardson’s patent, filed at the Boston patent office, included several new features including a special joint which allowed the bassinet to be turned to face the mother or whoever was pushing the carriage. Many of Richardson’s designs are still in use today. [There is some authority that Richardson’s patent was actually filed on June 18.] 1942—Harvard medical student, Bernard W. Robinson, becomes the first African-American to win a commission to the United States Navy. June 27 1872—Paul Lawrence Dunbar, one of the most popular poets in Black American history, is born in Dayton, Ohio. Dunbar first gained national recognition with a collection of works published in 1896 entitled “Lyrics of a Lowly Life,” which included “Ode to Ethiopia.” Despite the power of his poetry, Dunbar angered some Blacks who were concerned about “what will White people think” because he generally used Black dialect and not Standard English in much of his poetry. Dunbar’s first poem was published in a newspaper owned by high school friends and American airplane pioneers Orville and Wilbur Wright. The Wright brothers would also provide Dunbar with funds to open the Dayton Tattler—a newspaper geared toward the city’s Black community. Unfortunately, Dunbar died at the age of 34 in 1906 of Tuberculosis.