Tag: Michael Vick

LetterToEditor2.jpg

Opinion

‘Whitewashing’ by Black NFL players must stop

Dear Editor: In the Black community the Black professional athlete is often seen as a hero and role model. They are viewed as individuals who have overcome the barriers of poverty and racism.Some of these athletes make millions of dollars while other athletes make a comfortable living. Being a professional athlete affords many liberties that the average person does not have. The most important of these liberties is the ability to speak out and be heard. Some of our greatest athletes of the past used these liberties to help the civil rights movement. It appears that some Black NFL players of today use these same liberties to “whitewash” racist rants made by White teammates. For example, when Philadelphia Eagle wide-receiver Riley Cooper viciously used the -n- word at a Kenny Chesney concert, many Black players rushed to his defense.

Eagles_Cooper_Footbal_Broa-1.jpg

Sports

Eagles excuse Cooper from team after racial slur at Chesney concert

Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Riley Cooper meets with the media at NFL football training camp on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, in Philadelphia. Cooper has been fined by the team for making a racial slur at a Kenny Chesney concert that was caught on video, leading him to say he’s “ashamed and disgusted” with himself. (AP Photo/Philadelphia Daily News, Yong Kim) PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Philadelphia Eagles excused Riley Cooper from all team activities on Friday as the wide receiver deals with repercussions of being caught on video making a racial slur. Cooper has been sent away from the team to get help with his issues, something the player and the team agreed upon. Coach Chip Kelly made it clear after Friday’s practice, however, that Cooper would be back with the team when he’s ready. “There has never been any question of cutting Riley,” Kelly said. “His status with us is not in question.”

Draft_10_Things_to_Wa_Broa.jpg

Sports

NFL draft: 10 things to watch for during draft

FASHION STATEMENT– In this April 26, 2012 photo, quarterback Robert Griffin III, right, poses for photographs with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell after he was selected as the second pick overall by the Washington Redskins in the first round of the NFL football draft in New York. Fashionistas surely will be tracking the expensive, colorful designer suits, hairstyles (think dreadlocks) and even socks of the draftees as they take the stage after being selected. (Think Robert Griffin III, the Redskins’ top pick in 2012, who wore a baby blue jacket, checkered-patterned shirt, purplish tie with horizontal stripes, and burgundy and gold socks. Fashion is one of the things to watch for during the three-day NFL draft beginning Thursday, April 25, 2013. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow, File) by Richard Rosenblatt NEW YORK (AP) — Since 1936, the NFL has picked the best of college football to join the pro league. From the very first pick — Jay Berwanger, who also was the first bust, never playing a down in the NFL — to last year’s No. 1, Andrew Luck, the draft has always offered plenty of intrigue for teams and fans.