Tag: March on Washington

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Opinion

D.C. marches were inclusive up to a point

GEORGE E. CURRY (NNPA)—Organizers of the two recent marches on Washington—one called by Al Sharpton and Martin Luther King III and the other engineered primarily by King’s sister, Bernice—almost stumbled over one another praising the diversity of their respective marches. However, not one addressed the elephant in the room: Why was more emphasis placed on bringing in groups that were not part of the push for jobs and freedom in 1963 than assembling a broad coalition of Black leaders? To be even more direct: How can you justify excluding Minister Louis Farrakhan? After all, he managed to draw more Black men to the nation’s capital on Oct. 16, 1995 than the combined crowds at the 1963 March on Washington, the Sharpton-led march on Aug. 24 and the Aug. 28 commemorative march. In fact, the Million Man March at least doubled their combined attendance.

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Opinion

The GOP does something right for civil rights

RAYNARD JACKSON (NNPA)—Last week, the Republican National Committee, under the leadership of its chairman, Reince Priebus, did something that has never been done before in the history of the Republican Party. Their feat was so astonishing and yet few in the media is writing or talking about it. Priebus hosted a luncheon commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. The event accomplished something that no other March on Washington event was able to achieve. Sharpton’s event was a joke and an embarrassment. The King’s family event was a disappointment.

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National

Four ways to beat ‘The Man’

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gestures during his “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo/File) by John Blake (CNN) — Nan Grogan Orrock defied her family’s wishes by sneaking away to join the 1963 March on Washington. But don’t ask her about Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. She doesn’t remember it.