Tag: Labor economy

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Business

US businesses boost hiring despite the shutdown

In this May 30, 2013, photo, job seekers line up to talk to recruiters during a job fair held in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis, file) by Christopher RugaberAP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy may be sturdier than many had assumed. Employers added a surprisingly strong 204,000 jobs in October despite the 16-day government shutdown, the Labor Department said Friday. And they did a lot more hiring in August and September than previously thought.

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Youth

Why young people are saying ‘no’ to the workforce

Luis Mendez, 23, a student at Miami Dade College, left, and Maurice Mike, 23, a student at Florida International University, right, wait in line at an internship job fair held by the Miami Marlins, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, at Marlins Park in Miami. The internships are paid, offer a wide range of job opportunities and begin in January 2014, lasting one year. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky) by Steve Hargreaves (CNN)—A job used to be the next step after a diploma. But now, young people aren’t in any rush to start working.

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National

As government re-opens Obama warns: “The American people are completely fed up with Washington”

BACK IN BUSINESS–President Barack Obama speaks in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington on Oct. 17, 2013. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) by Andrew TaylorAssociated Press WriterWASHINGTON (AP) — The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress’ bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America’s credibility around the world.

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National

Government powers down; blame trading in capital

A National Park Service employee posts a sign reading “Because of the Federal Government SHUTDOWN All National Parks are Closed” on a barricade closing access to the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) by David Espo and Donna CassataAssociated Press Writers WASHINGTON (AP) — First slowed, then stalled by political gridlock, the vast machinery of government clanged into partial shutdown mode on Tuesday and President Barack Obama warned the longer it goes “the more families will be hurt.” Republicans said it was his fault, not theirs. Ominously, there were suggestions from leaders in both parties that the shutdown, heading for its second day, could last for weeks and grow to encompass a possible default by the Treasury if Congress fails to raise the nation’s debt ceiling. “This is now all together,” said Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill..