Tag:  Industry regulation

Texas_Abortion_Restri_Broa.jpg

National

Reinstatement of abortion law leaves few options

In this July 15, 2013 file photo, two signs that read “Who Lobbied For This?” and “We Need Healthcare Options, Not Obstacles” are held by attendees of a rally in front of Dallas city hall where a group of nearly 200 gathered to protest the approval of sweeping new restrictions on abortion in Texas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File) by Christopher Sherman and Chris TomlinsonAssociated Press Writers HARLINGEN, Texas (AP) — In a Texas abortion clinic, about a dozen women waited Friday to see the doctor, already aware that they would not be able to end their pregnancies there. A day after a federal appeals court allowed most of the state’s new abortion restrictions to take effect during a legal challenge, about a third of Texas’ clinics were barred from performing the procedure. Thursday’s ruling made Texas the fourth and largest state to enforce a provision requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges in a nearby hospital. In places such as the Rio Grande Valley and rural West Texas, the mandate put hundreds of miles between many women and abortion providers.

olaughs460x.jpg

National

Obama: Shutdown exposed clash of political visions

President Barack Obama, accompanied by Education Secretary Arne Duncan, right, laughs as he visits a classroom at Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) in Brooklyn borough of New York, Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, to highlight the importance of education in providing skills for American workers in a global economy. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Josh LedermanAssociated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Regrouping with Democrats after a bitter budget fight, President Barack Obama on Friday cast the recent spending-and-debt standoff with Congress as “a symptom of a larger challenge” but one offering Democrats the chance to show voters the virtues of their vision for government ahead of the 2014 midterm elections.

health460x.jpg

National

Healthcare.gov failures surface at Hill hearing

Cheryl Campbell, senior vice president of CGI listens at left as Andy Slavitt, representing QSSI’s parent company, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing with contractors that built the federal government’s health care websites. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci) by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Stephen OhlemacherAssociated Press Writers WASHINGTON (AP) — The leading contractors on the Obama administration’s troubled health insurance website told Congress Thursday that the government failed to thoroughly test the complicated system before it went live.

Mental_Health_Act_50__Broa.jpg

National

Kennedy’s vision for mental health never realized

In this Oct. 31, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy signs a bill authorizing $329 million for mental health programs at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Bill Allen, File) by Michelle R. SmithAssociated Press Writer PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The last piece of legislation President John F. Kennedy signed turns 50 this month: the Community Mental Health Act, which helped transform the way people with mental illness are treated and cared for in the United States.

Obama_Budget_Battle_Broa.jpg

National

As government re-opens Obama warns: “The American people are completely fed up with Washington”

BACK IN BUSINESS–President Barack Obama speaks in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington on Oct. 17, 2013. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) by Andrew TaylorAssociated Press WriterWASHINGTON (AP) — The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress’ bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America’s credibility around the world.

bums69-300.jpg

National

Time to throw my bum out of Congress?

President Barack Obama delivers the State of the Union address in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., February 12, 2013. (Photo by Lawrence Jackson/The White House) by Paul SteinhauserCNN Political Editor (CNN) — It’s conventional wisdom: Americans don’t like Congress. But when it comes time to vote, they usually don’t throw their lawmaker out of office. However, new polls indicate that times and perceptions about “throwing the bums out” may be changing.

Brazile348-300.jpg

Opinion

Republicans, stop living in fear

by Donna Brazile (CNN) — As Senate negotiators, led by Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell huddle for another day to avoid the nation’s default this week, we’ll know in a few days if Congress — more accurately, House Republicans — will choose to plunge this nation into a second recession, possibly triggering a global financial meltdown, or agree to compromise.

Obama_Reid_Broa.jpg

National

Reid: Soft-spoken, combative Obama partner vs GOP

President Barack Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., right, and other Democrat Senators meet in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) by Charles Babington and Nedra PicklerAssociated Press Writers WASHINGTON (AP) — Harry Reid, the soft-spoken but pugilistic Senate majority leader, didn’t wait for White House officials to declare their view of high-stakes talks over the government shutdown and debt. Standing just outside the West Wing, the 73-year-old Nevadan gave reporters his assessment of a key House Republican offer last week: “Not going to happen.”

Obama_Interview_Broa_edited-1.jpg

National

Obama to public: Don’t give up on health sign-ups

In this photo taken Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, President Barack Obama speaks during an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in the White House library in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Julie PaceAP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — Defending the shaky rollout of his health care law, President Barack Obama said frustrated Americans “definitely shouldn’t give up” on the problem-plagued program now at the heart of his dispute with Republicans over reopening the federal government.