Tag:  Immigration policy

Obama_Homeland_Securi_Broa.jpg

National

Obama taps Black former Pentagon senior attorney to head Homeland Security

President Barack Obama stands with Jeh Johnson, his choice for the next Homeland Security Secretary, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 18, 2013. Johnson was general counsel at the Defense Department during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Avis Thomas-LesterFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)–President Barack Obama has selected Jeh Johnson, a graduate of Morehouse and Columbia Law School, as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. If confirmed, Johnson, who retired from government to go into private practice, would come to the position with substantial experience, officials said.

Minority_Voters..jpg

National

In a first, Black voter turnout rate passes Whites

OHIO VOTER–Lauren Howie, 27, poses outside the School of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan) EDITOR’S NOTE _ “America at the Tipping Point: The Changing Face of a Nation” is an occasional series examining the cultural mosaic of the U.S. and its historic shift to a majority-minority nation. by Hope Yen WASHINGTON (AP) — Black Americans voted at a higher rate than other minority groups in 2012 and by most measures surpassed the White turnout for the first time, reflecting a deeply polarized presidential election in which Blacks strongly supported Barack Obama while many Whites stayed home.

Young460x.jpg

National

Alaska lawmaker apologizes for racial slur

REP. DON YOUNG, R-ALASKA (AP Photo/Dan Joling, File) by Jim Abrams WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Don Young, the gruff Republican veteran who represents the entire state of Alaska, apologized Friday for referring to Hispanic migrant workers as “wetbacks” in a radio interview.

National

Census: Whites no longer a majority in U.S. by 2043

by Hope YenAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — White people will no longer make up a majority of Americans by 2043, according to new census projections. That’s part of a historic shift that already is reshaping the nation’s schools, workforce and electorate, and is redefining long-held notions of race.