Tag:  Government policy

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National

Obama: ‘I’m sorry’ Americans are losing insurance

President Barack Obama speaks at Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall about the federal health care law. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File) by Julie PaceAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to calm a growing furor, President Barack Obama said Thursday he’s sorry Americans are losing health insurance plans he repeatedly said they could keep under his signature health care law. But the president stopped short of apologizing for making those promises in the first place.

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Health

What’s up with Obamacare and my healthcare?

In this Oct. 30, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall about the federal health care law. Now is when Americans start figuring out that President Barack Obama’s health care law goes beyond political talk, and really does affect them and people they know. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) by Jen Christensen (CNN) — As the politicians fuss and fight over the merits of the biggest overhaul of the health insurance system in this country, you may be wondering, “What does this all mean to me?” Here’s what we know so far about what’s up with your healthcare.

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National

JFK holds complex place in Black history

In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, women burst into tears outside Parkland Hospital upon hearing that President John F. Kennedy died from a shooting while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. (AP Photo/File) by Jesse WashingtonAP National Writer Not that many years ago, three portraits hung in thousands of African-American homes, a visual tribute to men who had helped Black people navigate the long journey to equality. There was Jesus, who represented unconditional hope, strength and love. There was Martin Luther King Jr., who personified the moral crusade that ended legal segregation. And then there was President John F. Kennedy.

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National

LAX suspect set out to kill multiple TSA officers

This photo provided by the FBI shows Paul Ciancia, 23. Authorities say Ciancia pulled a semi-automatic rifle from a bag and shot his way past a security checkpoint at the airport, killing a security officer and wounding other people. Ciancia was injured in a shootout and taken into custody, police said. (AP Photo/FBI) by Tami Abdollah and Gillian Flaccus Associated Press Writers LOS ANGELES (AP) — The unemployed motorcycle mechanic suspected in the deadly shooting at the Los Angeles airport set out to kill multiple employees of the Transportation Security Administration and hoped the attack would “instill fear in their traitorous minds,” authorities said Saturday. Paul Ciancia was so determined to take lives that, after shooting a TSA officer and going up an escalator, he turned back to see the officer move and returned to finish him off, according to surveillance video reviewed by investigators. In a news conference announcing charges against Ciancia, U.S. Attorney Andre Birotte Jr. spelled out a chilling chain of events at LAX that began when Ciancia strode into Terminal 3, pulled a Smith & Wesson .223-caliber assault rifle from his duffel bag and fired repeatedly at point-blank range at a TSA officer. The officer was checking IDs and boarding passes at the base of an escalator leading to the main screening area. After killing that officer, Ciancia fired on at least two other uniformed TSA employees and an airline passenger, who were all wounded. Airport police eventually shot him as panicked passengers cowered in stores and restaurants.

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National

Healthcare.gov failures surface at Hill hearing

Cheryl Campbell, senior vice president of CGI listens at left as Andy Slavitt, representing QSSI’s parent company, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing with contractors that built the federal government’s health care websites. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci) by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Stephen OhlemacherAssociated Press Writers WASHINGTON (AP) — The leading contractors on the Obama administration’s troubled health insurance website told Congress Thursday that the government failed to thoroughly test the complicated system before it went live.

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National

Obama taps Black former Pentagon senior attorney to head Homeland Security

President Barack Obama stands with Jeh Johnson, his choice for the next Homeland Security Secretary, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 18, 2013. Johnson was general counsel at the Defense Department during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Avis Thomas-LesterFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)–President Barack Obama has selected Jeh Johnson, a graduate of Morehouse and Columbia Law School, as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. If confirmed, Johnson, who retired from government to go into private practice, would come to the position with substantial experience, officials said.

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National

For Obama, a frustrating health care rollout

In this photo taken Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, President Barack Obama sits for an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in the White House library in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Julie PaceAP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — Last week, President Barack Obama gathered some of his top advisers in the Oval Office to discuss the problem-plagued rollout of his health care legislation. He told his team the administration had to own up to the fact that there were no excuses for not having the health care website ready to operate on Day One.

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National

As government re-opens Obama warns: “The American people are completely fed up with Washington”

BACK IN BUSINESS–President Barack Obama speaks in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington on Oct. 17, 2013. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) by Andrew TaylorAssociated Press WriterWASHINGTON (AP) — The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress’ bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America’s credibility around the world.