Tag: Food manufacturing

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Health

Trans fat doesn’t stir much ‘nanny state’ debate

This May 31, 2012 file photo shows a man leaveing a 7-Eleven store with a Double Gulp drink, in New York. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File) by Connie CassAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — They are among our most personal daily decisions: what to eat or drink. Maybe what to inhale. Now that the government’s banning trans fat, does that mean it’s revving up to take away our choice to consume all sorts of other unhealthy stuff? What about salt? Soda? Cigarettes?

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Business

Twinkies to return to shelves July 15

This undated image provided by Hostess Brands LLC shows a box of Twinkies. (AP Photo/Hostess Brands) by Candice Choi NEW YORK (AP) — Hostess is betting on a sweet comeback for Twinkies when they return to shelves next month. The company that went bankrupt after an acrimonious fight with its unionized workers last year is back up and running under new owners and a leaner structure. It says it plans to have Twinkies and other snack cakes back on shelves starting July 15.

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National

Protesters across globe rally against Monsanto

People carry signs during a protest against Monsanto in Montpelier, Vt. on Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. (AP Photo/Mark Collier)LOS ANGELES (AP) — Protesters rallied in dozens of cities Saturday as part of a global protest against seed giant Monsanto and the genetically modified food it produces, organizers said.

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Metro

Heinz brand, family ties, ubiquitous in Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH ICON– In this March 2, 2011 photo, Heinz ketchup is seen on the shelf of a market in Barre, Vt. H.J. Heinz Co. says it agreed to be acquired by an investment consortium including billionaire investor Warren Buffett in a deal valued at $28 billion. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File) by Joe Mandak Associated Press Writer PITTSBURGH (AP) — A company with its roots in a teenager selling bottles of horseradish is now as much a symbol of Pittsburgh as steel.