Tag: Family issues

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Metro

Therapist charged with beating adopted son

CHRISTOPHER SPANN PITTSBURGH (AP) – A family therapist who works to keep young men out of the child welfare system has been jailed on charges he badly beat his adopted 11-year-old son for not doing his homework. Christopher Spann, 52, of Pittsburgh, remained jailed Friday, a day after his arraignment on charges of aggravated assault, reckless endangerment, and endangering the welfare of a child. Spann pleaded not guilty.

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National

Neighboring Pa., NJ spotlight gay marriage efforts

State Sen. Daylin Leach, D-Montgomery, at podium, speaks during a news conference beneath the Robert Indiana sculpture “Love,” Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013, at John F. Kennedy Plaza, also known as Love Park, in Philadelphia. Democratic state Reps. Steve McCarter and Brian Sims say they are introducing a bill that would allow same-sex couples to get married legally in Pennsylvania. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) by Peter JacksonAssociated Press Writer HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania and New Jersey are on tracks that could lead to the Northeast being the first full region in the country to legalize gay marriage — but the routes are hardly parallel and the horsepower anything but equal. A flurry of recent court decisions has gay couples in New Jersey, where same-sex marriage has long been debated, hurrying to make wedding plans for when they can legally marry starting Monday — even as a moderate Republican governor with apparent presidential aspirations awaits a decision on his appeal. Across the Delaware River in Pennsylvania, advocates are pecking away at a 1996 gay marriage ban by introducing bills in the Legislature, defiantly issuing marriage licenses in localities and taking the issue to court — with few people conceding the tactics will work anytime soon in a big state with a socially conservative spine.

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Sports

Jason Collins came out; NBA should let him play

In this photo provided by ABC, NBA basketball veteran Jason Collins, left, poses for a photo with television journalist George Stephanopoulos, Monday, April 29, 2013, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/ABC, Eric McCandless) by Jeff Pearlman (CNN) — It was merely a dream, wasn’t it? That whole Jason Collins thing of six months ago — never happened, right? The headline news of his becoming the first openly gay active male professional athlete in a team sport. The Sports Illustrated cover. The supportive tweets from everyone ranging from Barack Obama and Bill Clinton to Jason Kidd and LeBron James. The interviews. The raves (“Game-changing!”). The altered landscape.

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National

Cherokee child handed over to adoptive parents

Veronica, the child at the center of an international adoption dispute, smiles in a bathroom of the Cherokee Nation Jack Brown Center in Tahlequah, Okla. (AP Photo/Tulsa World, Mike Simons, File) by Kristi EatonAssociated Press Writer OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A South Carolina couple who vowed last month to not leave Oklahoma unless they went home with a 4-year-old Cherokee girl they have been trying to adopt since her birth were given custody of the girl Monday night after the Oklahoma Supreme Court said it didn’t have jurisdiction over the child.

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Lifestyle

Ga. autism project looks to early detection

Marlaina Dreher, right, sits with her 5-year-old son, Brandon, who is autistic, before a session in the pediatric feeding disorder program at the Marcus Autism Center, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman) by Christina A. CassidyAssociated Press Writer ATLANTA (AP) — In a small room similar to a doctor’s office, Marlaina Dreher broke into applause as her 5-year-old son, Brandon, grabbed a red plastic spoon filled with puréed lasagna and fed himself.

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National

iPad video could be key in George Zimmerman case

In this June 24, 2013 file photo, George Zimmerman, left, arrives in Seminole circuit court, with his wife Shellie, in Sanford, Fla. (AP Photo/Orlando Sentinel, Joe Burbank, Pool, File) by Mike SchneiderAssociated Press Writer LAKE MARY, Fla. (AP) — Police investigating a domestic dispute between George Zimmerman and his estranged wife said Tuesday that video from her broken iPad may be crucial evidence in determining whether any charges are filed.

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National

NAACP preparing committee to search for new CEO

NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Jealous speaks at the Let Freedom Ring ceremony at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Aug. 28, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) by Brett ZongkerAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — The NAACP’s board is forming a search committee to find the next president and CEO for the nation’s largest civil rights organization, its chairwoman said Monday.

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National

Miss. law requires cord blood from some teen moms

Rep. Adrienne Wooten, D-Jackson addresses the House chamber during debate over a Medicaid reauthorization bill at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Wooten voted against a cord blood bill that says if a girl younger than 16 gives birth in Mississippi and won’t name the father authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File) JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — If a girl younger than 16 gives birth and won’t name the father, a new Mississippi law — likely the first of its kind in the country — says authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity as a step toward prosecuting statutory rape cases. Supporters say the law is intended to chip away at Mississippi’s teen pregnancy rate, which has long been one of the highest in the nation. But critics say that though the procedure is painless, it invades the medical privacy of the mother, father and baby. And questions abound: At roughly $1,000 a pop, who will pay for the DNA tests in the country’s poorest state? Even after test results arrive, can prosecutors compel a potential father to submit his own DNA and possibly implicate himself in a crime? How long will the state keep the DNA on file?