Tag:  Elections

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Metro

Peduto beats 2 opponents for Pittsburgh mayor

Democratic candidate for Mayor of Pittsburgh, City Councilman Bill Peduto, right, walks with his communications director Sonya Toler on his way to vote in the Pennsylvania primary election on May 21. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic/File) PITTSBURGH (AP) — Democrat Bill Peduto has defeated a pair of weak opponents in his bid for a four-year term as Pittsburgh’s next mayor.

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National

JFK holds complex place in Black history

In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, women burst into tears outside Parkland Hospital upon hearing that President John F. Kennedy died from a shooting while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. (AP Photo/File) by Jesse WashingtonAP National Writer Not that many years ago, three portraits hung in thousands of African-American homes, a visual tribute to men who had helped Black people navigate the long journey to equality. There was Jesus, who represented unconditional hope, strength and love. There was Martin Luther King Jr., who personified the moral crusade that ended legal segregation. And then there was President John F. Kennedy.

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National

Next step in stop-frisk depends on new NYC mayor

New York City Republican mayoral candidate Joe Lhota, left, and Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio, participate in their first televised debate at WABC/Channel 7 studios on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013 in New York. The debate, the first of three before the Nov. 5 general election, was hosted by the New York Daily News, WABC-TV, Noticias 41 Univision and the League of Women Voters. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool) by Jonathan Lemire and Colleen LongAssociated Press WritersNEW YORK (AP) — Front-running mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio faces political and legal dilemmas now that a judge’s ruling critical of the police department’s stop-and-frisk tactic has been blocked.

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National

Obama: Shutdown exposed clash of political visions

President Barack Obama, accompanied by Education Secretary Arne Duncan, right, laughs as he visits a classroom at Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) in Brooklyn borough of New York, Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, to highlight the importance of education in providing skills for American workers in a global economy. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Josh LedermanAssociated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Regrouping with Democrats after a bitter budget fight, President Barack Obama on Friday cast the recent spending-and-debt standoff with Congress as “a symptom of a larger challenge” but one offering Democrats the chance to show voters the virtues of their vision for government ahead of the 2014 midterm elections.

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National

Fla.’s Crist plots political comeback as Democrat

In this Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012 file photo, President Obama, left, talks with former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist at a campaign rally in Seminole, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara, File) by Michael J. MiishakAssociated Press Writer ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Charlie Crist had barely entered the room before a throng of teachers swarmed him. The union delegates — and stalwart Democrats — wanted autographs, pictures, hugs and even kisses from the former Republican governor.

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National

Obama taps Black former Pentagon senior attorney to head Homeland Security

President Barack Obama stands with Jeh Johnson, his choice for the next Homeland Security Secretary, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 18, 2013. Johnson was general counsel at the Defense Department during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Avis Thomas-LesterFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)–President Barack Obama has selected Jeh Johnson, a graduate of Morehouse and Columbia Law School, as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. If confirmed, Johnson, who retired from government to go into private practice, would come to the position with substantial experience, officials said.

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National

In life and especially in death, JFK changed TV

In this July 3, 1963 file photo, U.S. President John F. Kennedy stands at the lectern behind a production slate board during a television taping at the White House. (AP Photo) by Frazier Moore AP Television Writer NEW YORK (AP) — It’s a measure of how long ago President John F. Kennedy died that, at the time, television was described as a young medium. With the shooting in Dallas, TV grew up. Coverage that November weekend 50 years ago signaled, at last, that television could fulfill its grand promise. It could be “more than wires and lights in a box,” in the words of newsman Edward R. Murrow, and not just the “vast wasteland” that Federal Communications Commission chairman Newton Minow had branded it just two years before.

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National

Time to throw my bum out of Congress?

President Barack Obama delivers the State of the Union address in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., February 12, 2013. (Photo by Lawrence Jackson/The White House) by Paul SteinhauserCNN Political Editor (CNN) — It’s conventional wisdom: Americans don’t like Congress. But when it comes time to vote, they usually don’t throw their lawmaker out of office. However, new polls indicate that times and perceptions about “throwing the bums out” may be changing.

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Opinion

America’s problem: We’re too dumb

by LZ Granderson (CNN) — I’m a sucker for all of those man-on-the-street interviews that late-night shows do to reveal just how dumb Americans are. It’s fun to laugh at the people who struggle with simple math problems or are unable to find any country we’re at war with on a map. More than a few even get tripped up trying to name the branches of government. It’s all fun and games until you remember that elections have consequences, and that many of those people who said they could name the president — but not the commander in chief — will soon be standing in a voting booth, armed with a ballot.