Tag: Egypt

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International

For Obama, world looks far different than expected

In this photo taken Aug. 22, 2013, President Barack Obama walks along the West Wing colonnade of the White House in Washington before traveling to New York and Pennsylvania. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) by Julie PaceAP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly five years into his presidency, Barack Obama confronts a world far different from what he envisioned when he first took office. U.S. influence is declining in the Middle East as violence and instability rock Arab countries. An ambitious attempt to reset U.S. relations with Russia faltered and failed. Even in Obama-friendly Europe, there’s deep skepticism about Washington’s government surveillance programs.

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International

Death toll soars to 638 in Egypt violence

Injured supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi lie on the ground after Egyptian security forces clear a sit-in camp set up by supporters of Morsi in Nasr City district, Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa) by Maggie Michael Associated Press Writer CAIRO (AP) — Weeping relatives in search of loved ones uncovered the faces of the bloodied, unclaimed dead in a Cairo mosque near the smoldering epicenter of support for ousted President Mohammed Morsi, as the death toll soared past 600 Thursday from Egypt’s deadliest day since the Arab Spring began.

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Generation Y

From Egypt’s street, a new techno sound

In this Sunday, June 2, 2013 photo, An Egyptian man dances, as “Mahraganat”, Arabic for “festivals,” singers, Fifty and Sadat, not pictured, perform at a wedding in Madinet el-Salam on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty) by Nariman El-Mofty CAIRO (AP) — “We tell the stories of our people, words that come up from our alleys, listen to me to understand” — from the Mahraganat song, “El-Rab El-Masri” (Egyptian Rap) by Sadat, Fifty and Haha. A new musical sound emerged from the underground in Egypt since the country’s 2011 revolution, a rapid-fire electronic beat, mixed with hypnotic rhythms drawn from religious festivals and fired up with auto-tuned vocals. Besides getting club crowds dancing all night long, it has given a rebellious voice to long marginalized youth, telling stories of everyday life in beaten-down neighborhoods of Cairo.

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International

Egyptians targeted with blasphemy charges

This undated photo provided by the lawyer of Dimyana Abdel-Nour, shows Abdel-Nour, 24, a Coptic Christian teacher in the southern Egyptian city of Luxor in a family photo. (AP Photo) by Maggie Michael CAIRO (AP) — The pale, young Christian woman sat handcuffed in the courtroom, accused of insulting Islam while teaching history of religions to fourth-graders. A team of Islamist lawyers with long beards sang in unison, “All except the Prophet Muhammad.”

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National

Pressure cooker bombs used in past by militants

HOMEMADE–This Homeland Security Department pamphlet, from July 2010, distributed to police, fore, EMS and security personnel shows a diagram for rudimentary improvised explosive devices (IEDs) using pressure cookers to contain the initiator, switch and explosive charge. (AP Photo/Homeland Security Department) by Lee Keath CAIRO (AP) — Homemade bombs built from pressure cookers, a version of which was used in the Boston Marathon bombings, have been a frequent weapon of militants in Afghanistan, India and Pakistan. Al-Qaida’s branch in Yemen once published an online manual on how to make one, urging “lone jihadis” to act on their own to carry out attacks.

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International

UN adopts plan to combat violence against women

PROTEST–An Egyptian protester shouts slogans as she holds an anti-Muslim brotherhood poster during a protest in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, March 2. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil) by Edith M. LedererAssociated Press Writer UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Conservative Muslim and Roman Catholic countries and liberal Western nations approved a U.N. blueprint to combat violence against women and girls, ignoring strong objections from Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood that it clashed with Islamic principles and sought to destroy the family.