Tag: East Africa



Kenya Muslim leader: I could be killed next

In this photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, Abubakar Shariff Ahmed, an influential member of a controversial mosque where two previous mosque leaders were killed under mysterious circumstances, sits in his office in Mombasa, Kenya. Writing in Arabic on islamist flag reads “There is no God but God and Muhammed is his messenger”. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso) by Jason StraziusoAssociated Press Writer MOMBASA, Kenya (AP) — In August 2012, a leader of a Kenyan mosque that has attracted extremist followers was shot dead as he drove through the streets of Mombasa. Fourteen months later, another leader of the same mosque met the same fate. There have been no arrests in either case. Abubakar Shariff Ahmed, an Islamic community leader associated with the same mosque, is certain that he will also be killed. And he believes — as do many others — that the police haven’t solved the two high-profile killings because they are the ones who carried them out. Riots broke out in Mombasa after Aboud Rogo was killed in August 2012 and after Sheik Ibrahim Ismael was killed in October, and tensions remain high in this shabby seaside city ringed by high-end resorts that sit on white-sand beaches.



After Kenya mall attack, children’s trauma lingers

14-month old Azzurra sits with a lipstick kiss on her cheek from her mother Cynthia Carpino, both of whom were caught up in the Westgate Mall attack, at their apartment in Nairobi, Kenya. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis) by Rukmini CallimachiAssociated Press Writer NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — When the shooting began at the Nairobi mall, Cynthia Carpino and her husband hid in the parking lot. But their 1-year-old daughter wouldn’t stop crying. To muffle her cries, her father placed his hand over her mouth so hard she almost suffocated. Little Azzurra fainted in his arms, and three weeks later she’s still not right.



Film Review: Somali Pirates ‘steal’ the show in ‘Captain Phillips’

This photo released by Sony – Columbia Pictures shows, from left, Faysal Ahmed, Barkhad Abdi, Barkhad Abdirahman, Mahat Ali, in a scene from the film, “Captain Phillips,” releasing in the US on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013. The amateur actors of Somali descent from Minneapolis made their film debut acting as Somali pirates alongside the two-time Academy Award winner, Tom Hanks. (AP Photo/Copyright Sony – Columbia Pictures, Jasin Boland) Like many other movie critics, I’m falling in line to say “Captain Phillips” is one of this year’s best movies. Captain Phillips, based on a true story from 2009 headlines, is an action-packed tale of a group of Somali pirates who takeover a US container ship, MV Maersk Alabama. Captain Phillips (Tom Hanks) is on a tight schedule to deliver 17,000 tons of cargo to Kenya. Ignoring several advisories to stay clear of the Somalia coast, Phillips still managed to get on the radar of 4 Somali pirates. Led by a frail, focused Muse (Barkhad Abd), the African bandits took the 20-person crew and ship hostage looking for riches and gold. When the heist comes up short, the armed men take veteran seaman Phillips instead.



Terror, mass shootings don’t mean more danger

A man walks through City Creek shopping center in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013. Jack Harry Stiles was arrested Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, accused of plotting a deadly attack on the mall in the heart of Salt Lake City, telling investigators he planned to “just randomly shoot and kill people.” (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) by Jesse WashingtonAP National Writer It almost feels these days as if there is no safe place — that after global jihad strikes a Nairobi shopping mall or a deranged shooter invades the Washington Navy Yard, the next target could very well be our own store, school, theater or stadium. Yet those who study such violence have a message: Don’t worry.