Tag: Dementia

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Sports

Tony Dorsett struggles with memory loss, personality changes

Former University of Pittsburgh and NFL Hall of Fame running back Tony Dorsett stands on the sideline before the start of an NCAA football game between Pittsburgh and Notre Dame on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) by Steve Almasy and Eliott C. McLaughlin (CNN) — Tony Dorsett recalls a 1984 game against the Philadelphia Eagles when he was streaking up the field and an opposing player slammed into him. One helmet plowed into another. Dorsett’s head snapped back, his helmet was knocked askew. “He blew me up,” Dorsett told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer. “I don’t remember the second half of that game, but I do remember that hit.” Dorsett compared the hit to a freight train hitting a Volkswagen.

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Metro

Missing Pa. man with dementia, ex-Steeler, found

In this Oct. 12, 1952, file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers football player Ray Mathews gathers in a pass for a touchdown against the Philadelphia Eagles, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/File) BOYERS, Pa. (AP) – An 84-year-old western Pennsylvania man who reportedly suffers from dementia and once played for the Pittsburgh Steelers is expected to be OK after he spent about 20 hours in the woods after not returning from a walk.

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Health

Study: Later retirement may help prevent dementia

June Springer, poses for a photograph, where she works at Caffi Contracting Services, July 12, in Alexandria, Va. Springer who just turned 90, works as a receptionist. People who delay retirement have less risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia, a study of half a million people in France found. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) BOSTON (AP) — New research boosts the “use it or lose it” theory about brainpower and staying mentally sharp. People who delay retirement have less risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia, a study of nearly half a million people in France found. It’s by far the largest study to look at this, and researchers say the conclusion makes sense. Working tends to keep people physically active, socially connected and mentally challenged — all things known to help prevent mental decline.