Tag: Corporate legal affairs

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Entertainment

Marvin Gaye’s children sue Robin Thicke over ‘Blurred Lines’

This file photo shows singer-actress Nona Gaye by Anthony McCartneyAP Entertainment Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) — Two of Marvin Gaye’s children sued Robin Thicke and his collaborators on the hit song “Blurred Lines” on Wednesday, accusing them of copyright infringement and alleging music company EMI failed to protect their father’s legacy. Nona Marvisa Gaye and Frankie Christian Gaye’s suit is the latest salvo in a dispute over Thicke’s hit and whether it copies elements of Gaye’s song “Got to Give It Up.” Their lawsuit seeks to block Thicke and collaborators Pharrell and T.I. from using elements of their father’s music in “Blurred Lines” or other songs.

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Entertainment

What if Michael Jackson was still alive?

In this Dec. 3, 1984 photo, Michael Jackson performs with his brothers at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, as part of their Victory Tour concert. (AP Photo/Doug Pizac, file) by Anthony McCartneyAP Entertainment Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) — If Michael Jackson were still alive today, he would have just celebrated his 55th birthday and the world would know the outcome of his comeback efforts. He might be embarking on a new career in filmmaking and probably would be nudging his eldest son in the same direction.

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Business

Abercrombie & Fitch settles Calif. suits over head scarves

Hani Khan, a former stockroom worker for Abercrombie & Fitch Co. who was fired for refusing to remove her Muslim headscarf, listens to a question during a news conference in San Francisco, Monday, June 27, 2011. (AP Photo/File) by Paul EliasAssociated Press WriterSAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Trendy clothing retailer Abercrombie & Fitch has agreed to make religious accommodations and allow workers to wear head scarves as part of a settlement of discrimination lawsuits filed in California, lawyers announced Monday.

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National

Traffic cameras bring tiny Ohio village to a stop

Catherine Jones sits outside her namesake restaurant, in Elmwood Place, Ohio. Jones understands the community’s need to install speed cameras to quell speeding, but now she is among many small business owners worried that the cameras have given the village a speed trap stigma. (AP Photo/Al Behrman, File) by Dan Sewell ELMWOOD PLACE, Ohio (AP) — This little village had a big problem. Each day, thousands of cars — sometimes as many as 18,000 — rolled along Elmwood Place’s streets, crossing the third-of-a-mile town to get to neighboring Cincinnati or major employers in bustling suburbs or heavily traveled Interstate 75. Many zipped by Elmwood Place’s modest homes and small businesses at speeds well above the 25 mph limit. Bedeviled by tight budgets, the police force was undermanned. The situation, villagers feared, was dangerous. Then the cameras were turned on, and all hell broke loose.

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People

Tyson sues Live Nation over alleged embezzlement

ONE MAN SHOW—In this June 18, 2012 photo, former heavyweight boxer Mike Tyson announces “Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth” a one man show on Broadway, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File) LOS ANGELES (AP) — Mike Tyson sued a financial services firm owned by Live Nation Entertainment on Wednesday, claiming one of its advisers embezzled more than $300,000 from the former heavyweight champ and cost him millions more in lost earnings.