Tag: college

Georgia_Tech_Fraterni_Broa.jpg

Generation Y

‘Rapebait’ e-mail reveals dark side of frat culture

A runner makes her way past the Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity on Georgia Tech’s campus Tuesday afternoon Oct. 8, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Ben Gray) by John Foubert Special to CNN (CNN) — An e-mail from a Georgia Tech fraternity member to his Phi Kappa Tau brothers came to light this week. It was about how to “succeed at parties,” or more specifically “luring your rapebait.” It came with repulsively detailed instructions about how to scope out a target, weaken her defenses with alcohol, grab her and — you get the idea.

Smith-Jomonna-kids.jpg

Metro

Racial disparities in PA increased in 50 years

Jomonna Smith listens to her children, 12-year-old Mon’Dayja and 9-year-old Mon’Dae, answer the doctor’s questions about school, chores and their health. (Public Source Photo/Alexandra Kanik) by Halle Stockton (Public Source)–Jomonna Smith, a 30-year-old woman, held her last job in 2008 as a store cashier. She is a single mother of three children, making ends meet with government assistance, styling hair on the side and a bit of family help. She relies on buses to get around and pays $301 a month to live in a public housing project in Braddock, a borough southeast of Pittsburgh. But she craves more for herself and her children.

Wayne-Fredrick.jpg.jpg

Generation Y

College: ‘The best four or five years of your life’

by Maya Rhodan NNPA Washington Correspondent WASHINGTON (NNPA) – When Mecala Holmes was a freshman at Howard University in 2008, she recalls seeing a t-shirt in the school’s book store that read “Howard University, the best four or five years of your life.” Holmes recalled, “I saw that and thought ‘I’m not going to be here for five years. And then I finished my freshman year and I thought ‘I’m about to finish in five years.” Holmes, a computer engineering major, decided to take 12 credits every semester to better balance her challenging curriculum with the social opportunities Howard had to offer—from events, to social and service organizations such as Jewels, Inc. a mentoring program she was an active member of throughout college. Twelve credits per semester, however, wouldn’t help her accrue the 126 she needed to graduate within four years. Although Holmes had realized she wouldn’t be graduating with the class, watching her friends and peers prepare for their long-awaited commencement without her was emotional for her. “Last year, I cried on graduation day,” Holmes said. “But if I had graduated last year I wouldn’t have the opportunities I have now. Looking back, I wouldn’t have done it differently.”