Tag: Child welfare

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National

Boy who killed Nazi dad at age 10 to be sentenced

In this Oct. 22, 2010 file photo, Jeff Hall, who was killed by his son, holds a Neo Nazi flag while standing at Sycamore Highlands Park near his home in Riverside, Calif. (AP Photo/Sandy Huffaker, File) by Amy TaxinAssociated Press Writer SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — The boy was 10 when he put a gun to the head of his sleeping neo-Nazi father and pulled the trigger. It was over in an instant for Jeff Hall, but sorting out the fate of his troubled son has been a 2 1/2-year journey that approaches its final stage Friday in a hearing to determine where he’ll spend his teens and, possibly, his early adult years.

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National

Cherokee child handed over to adoptive parents

Veronica, the child at the center of an international adoption dispute, smiles in a bathroom of the Cherokee Nation Jack Brown Center in Tahlequah, Okla. (AP Photo/Tulsa World, Mike Simons, File) by Kristi EatonAssociated Press Writer OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A South Carolina couple who vowed last month to not leave Oklahoma unless they went home with a 4-year-old Cherokee girl they have been trying to adopt since her birth were given custody of the girl Monday night after the Oklahoma Supreme Court said it didn’t have jurisdiction over the child.

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National

Miss. law requires cord blood from some teen moms

Rep. Adrienne Wooten, D-Jackson addresses the House chamber during debate over a Medicaid reauthorization bill at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Wooten voted against a cord blood bill that says if a girl younger than 16 gives birth in Mississippi and won’t name the father authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File) JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — If a girl younger than 16 gives birth and won’t name the father, a new Mississippi law — likely the first of its kind in the country — says authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity as a step toward prosecuting statutory rape cases. Supporters say the law is intended to chip away at Mississippi’s teen pregnancy rate, which has long been one of the highest in the nation. But critics say that though the procedure is painless, it invades the medical privacy of the mother, father and baby. And questions abound: At roughly $1,000 a pop, who will pay for the DNA tests in the country’s poorest state? Even after test results arrive, can prosecutors compel a potential father to submit his own DNA and possibly implicate himself in a crime? How long will the state keep the DNA on file?

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International

Argentina: Women will now collect welfare money

Andrea Nerone, center, sits with her daughters Malena, right, and Candela at their home during an interview in Buenos Aires, Argentina.(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) by Debora Rey BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — Andrea Nerone lost her home and later was denied welfare to support her family after her husband abandoned her and their four children late last year. Unemployed and no longer able to pay the rent on their previous home, Nerone crowded with her kids into a modest house owned by her mother and collected welfare for a few months. But the payments were cut off when the government determined that the children’s father was employed and thus able to support them. The big problem: the family was no longer in contact with him and he wasn’t giving them any money.

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International

Half of girls in South Sudan forced to marry

CHILD BRIDE–Zali Idy, 12, poses in her bedroom in the remote village of Hawkantaki, Niger. Zali was married in 2011. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay-file) by Charlton Doki Associated Press Writer JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — The 17-year-old beaten to death for refusing to marry a man old enough to be her grandfather. The teen dragged by her family to be raped to force her into marrying an elderly man.

National

U.S. gun support runs far deeper than politics

by Paul J. WeberAssociated Press Writer BRYAN, Texas (AP) — Adam Lanza’s mother was among the tens of millions of U.S. gun owners. She legally had a .223-caliber Bushmaster rifle and a pair of handguns, which her 20-year-old son used to kill 20 children and six adults in 10 minutes inside a Connecticut school. GUN LOVER– In this Dec. 19 photo, gun store owner Dave Burdett talks about gun rights as he displays a hand gun in his store in College Station, Texas. Burdett, who owns an outdoors and adventure shop across the street from the sprawling Texas A&M University campus in College Station, says his affinity for guns is rooted in history, not sport. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)